TECH::Sneak preview! Converting 7-Mode NAS Troubleshooting Commands to clustered Data ONTAP Commands

It’s Technical Report revision time again, as we await the next release of clustered Data ONTAP – 8.3.1.

While writing my new revision of TR-4073: Secure Unified Authentication, I was making a table of commands for NAS troubleshooting that I converted from 7-Mode to cDOT. The TR won’t be available for a bit, but I can at least post the table here for you to peruse/use. Check back on occasion for updates. If you have things you want me to add, comment here or follow me on Twitter @NFSDudeAbides!

7-Mode Command Clustered Data ONTAP 8.3.x Command What it does
exportfs –c vserver export-policy check-access Verifies if a specific host has access to a specific mount and what level of access it has.
exportfs –f vserver export-policy cache flush Flushes the exports cache on a local node. Use with caution, as flushing cache causes it to need to be repopulated.
fsecurity show vserver security file-directory show Show the file owner, ACLs, permissions, etc. from ONTAP CLI.
getXXbyYY getXXbyYY Allows simulation of external name service queries from ONTAP CLI. (ie, LDAP, NIS)
ifstat node run ifstat Shows physical network port statistics.
lock status/break vserver locks show/break Shows and breaks NFS or CIFS locks on files. Use with caution.
nbtstat vserver cifs nbtstat Shows NetBIOS information.
netstat node run netstat

network connections active show

network connections listening show

Shows network status, port information (listening, open, etc).
nfs diag show

access_cache

nsdb_cache

diag exports nblade access-cache show

diag nblade credentials show

Show diagnostic level NFS information. Use with caution.
nfs nsdb flush diag nblade credentials flush Flush the nsdb (Name Services Database) cache.
nfs_hist N/A Shows nfs histogram.
nfsstat statistics start -object nfs*/statistics stop Shows NFS related statistics.
nis info nis show-statistics

nis show-bound-debug

Shows NIS information.
options nfs.mountd.trace logger mgwd log modify -node -module mgwd::exports -level debug Shows trace output of mount requests. Use with caution and always disable after use. Logs to /mroot/etc/mlog/mgwd.log.
options cifs.trace_login diag secd trace set -node -trace-all yes

diag secd log set -node -level debug -enter-exit on

Shows trace output of name mapping, CIFS logins,etc. Use with caution and always disable after use. Logs to /mroot/etc/mlog/secd.log.
ping network ping Runs ping.
pktt node run [nodename] pktt Collects a packet capture. For details on packet traces in clustered Data ONTAP, see the following knowledge base article.

How to collect packet traces in clustered Data ONTAP

route network route Create/show/delete routes.
sectrace vserver security trace filter Used to troubleshoot security/permissions issues. For more information, see the following knowledge base article:

How to troubleshoot Microsoft Client permission issues on a NetApp Vserver running Clustered Data ONTAP

showfh node run [nodename where file lives] “priv set diag; showfh” Shows the file handle, FSID, etc for files and folders.
traceroute traceroute Trace routes between devices.
wcc diag nblade credentials

diag secd authentication show-creds

Show/flush credential stores on local nodes. Use with caution.
ypcat N/A Dumps contents of entire NIS map.
ypmatch diag secd authentication show-ontap-admin-unix-creds Fetches NIS object’s attributes.
ypwhich diag secd connections show -node [nodename] -vserver [SVM] -type nis Shows the NIS map server/master.

In addition, check out the Command Map for 7-Mode administrators, as well as How 7-Mode Configuration Files Map to cDOT commands and How 7-Mode Options Map to cDOT commands.

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6 thoughts on “TECH::Sneak preview! Converting 7-Mode NAS Troubleshooting Commands to clustered Data ONTAP Commands

  1. Pingback: Why Is the Internet Broken: Greatest Hits | Why Is The Internet Broken?

  2. hi Justin,

    This is out of context etc but no harm in asking. When we decomm LUNs we reset LUN stats to zero before offlining and destroying. That way we know that if a LUN has got zero stats on it, its not used.
    We havent been able to find a similar way of doing this per volume with nfs (used by ESX). is it at all possible?
    I know we can enable an nfs option and then run nfsstat -l to monitor 1 host access but that doesnt solve the issue as nfsstats is protocol wide, not volume wide. The other option is to use a tool like NMC etc. But via CLI, any options?

    Like

    • You can do volume level stats. These include NFS operations. In cDOT they look like this:

      cm8040-cluster::*> statistics start -object volume -node cm8040-cluster-01

      cm8040-cluster::*> statistics show -object volume -instance home -counter nfs_read_ops|nfs_other_ops|nfs_write_ops

      Object: volume
      Instance: home
      Start-time: 3/11/2016 08:22:48
      End-time: 3/11/2016 08:22:55
      Elapsed-time: 8s
      Vserver: nfs

      Counter Value
      ——————————– ——————————–
      nfs_other_ops 0
      nfs_read_ops 0
      nfs_write_ops 0
      3 entries were displayed.

      After a list/write:

      cm8040-cluster::*> statistics show -object volume -instance home -counter nfs_read_ops|nfs_other_ops|nfs_write_ops

      Object: volume
      Instance: home
      Start-time: 3/11/2016 08:22:48
      End-time: 3/11/2016 08:23:17
      Elapsed-time: 29s
      Vserver: nfs

      Counter Value
      ——————————– ——————————–
      nfs_other_ops 1
      nfs_read_ops 0
      nfs_write_ops 0
      3 entries were displayed.

      Plenty of other counters for NFS on a per-volume basis. 7-Mode vol stats also have this. Stats commands are a little different there:

      stats start volume
      stats show volume

      Like

      • hi Justin

        Thanks for that. I forgot to mention for decomm jobs we require historical and cumulative stats over time, like ‘lun stats’ output. My bad. Thanks for your time, love your blog! Im here all the time.

        Cheers,
        Eric

        Like

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