Behind the Scenes Episode 342 – All About Yves (Weisser), Kubernetes and GitHub Repos

Welcome to the Episode 342, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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This week on the podcast, NetApp Solutions Architect Yves Weisser (yves.weisser@netapp.com, @YvosPivo) joins us to discuss his Kubernetes journey, Astra, his excellent GitHub repo and the French NetApp podcast!

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Transcription

The following transcript was generated using Adobe Premeire Pro’s speech to text service and then further edited. As it is AI generated, YMMV.

Episode 342: All About Yves (Weisser), Kubernetes and GitHub Repos

00;00;00;24 – 00;00;07;23
Justin Parisi
This week on the TechONTAP podcast, Yves Weisser joins us to talk to us all about his Kubernetes journey as well as his GitHub repo.

00;00;07;23 – 00;00;32;27
Justin Parisi
[Podcast intro]

00;00;33;08 – 00;00;37;25
Yves Weisser
[Yves showing off with his French]

00;00;37;26 – 00;00;39;03
Justin Parisi
Woah woah woah woah woah

00;00;39;04 – 00;00;40;09
Justin Parisi
What do you think you’re doing, Eve?

00;00;41;00 – 00;00;43;10
Yves Weisser
Yeah, I’m just taking the the seat today.

00;00;44;09 – 00;00;57;27
Justin Parisi
This is not a French podcast. Though, we do have one. We’ll cover that here in a second. So, yeah, this is the Tech ONTAP podcast. My name is Justin Parisi, and with me today, we, of course, we have Yves Weisser. He is here to talk to us all about what he does here at NetApp as well as his GitHub repo.

00;00;57;27 – 00;01;05;06
Justin Parisi
So, Yves, in English (en anglais) tell us what you do here at NetApp and how to reach us.

00;01;05;17 – 00;01;30;18
Yves Weisser
I will try to use my best English today. So yeah, I’ve been part of NetApp for about 15 years, so I guess I’m part of the wars now, right? I am currently a solution architect and I focus mainly on Kubernetes. I’ve been working on Kubernetes for I don’t know. Pretty soon, five years. So I like it a lot.

00;01;30;18 – 00;01;34;10
Yves Weisser
Good! We’ll talk more about that here in a second. So how do we reach you if I want to reach you?

00;01;35;17 – 00;02;00;11
Yves Weisser
Oh, there are many ways to do so. Obviously, the easiest one would be to use either my GitHub account and well, I will try to say it out loud. It’s Yvos on the hub or in one word Y-V-O-S on the hub is one. Otherwise you have LinkedIn, obviously you have email, you have Twitter. Yves is Y-V-E-S.

00;02;00;11 – 00;02;07;09
Yves Weisser
I know. It’s not the easiest one. Weisser is W-E-I-double S-E-R

00;02;07;09 – 00;02;18;25
Justin Parisi
Cool, so we’ll put that in the show notes so that people don’t have to try to write it down and spell it out in that sort of thing. So they’ll be able to click on a link. We’ll talk more about that GitHub repo in a second, but I want to talk a little bit more about how you get started with Kubernetes.

00;02;19;07 – 00;02;26;01
Justin Parisi
Take us back to that first day where you started playing with it. Like what got you interested and what were some of the challenges you faced?

00;02;27;17 – 00;02;50;21
Yves Weisser
So first, before playing with Kubernetes, I played with Docker, right? So at NetApp, we sometimes do some hands on labs with customers, partners or even colleagues. And I don’t know, like four or five years ago, we, we used to give the labs, so we’ll have a Docker and how to use what used to be called NetApp Docker Volume Plug-in.

00;02;51;05 – 00;03;15;23
Yves Weisser
We had many meetings with many labs and even Insight. If you remember, we already were using GitHub to share the lab information and documentation and comment. And so on. And pretty soon Kubernetes went into the game. I started learning about Kubernetes and I started from scratch, so I knew nothing about it, aside from the basic definition of it. And so I started playing with Kubernetes on my own.

00;03;15;27 – 00;03;39;05
Yves Weisser
And, well, you have to imagine I hit many walls because, well, four years ago, five years ago, and still today, Kubernetes is complex. So I guess for me, the best way to learn about Kubernetes is to try and try and try again, break and try and try and break again. And retry. And that’s how I got hooked up with Kubernetes.

00;03;39;05 – 00;04;06;25
Yves Weisser
The challenges I faced because, well, I learned by myself. And again, complexity made its world difficult to put on. It’s not like learning just about how to create an NFS share and using snapshot and SnapMirror. That takes me back 15 years ago. There are so many moving pieces in Kubernetes – storage being one of them – that’s you have to be pretty involved in what you want to achieve in order to really understand Kubernetes.

00;04;06;25 – 00;04;16;24
Yves Weisser
And it’s moving so quickly also that, well, you learn every day and that’s what is fun because for me, Kubernetes is also a lot of fun, I would say.

00;04;16;24 – 00;04;39;28
Justin Parisi
It’s good. It’s good that you have fun with it because it is challenging. It’s an open source technology. So that kind of lends to that whole things are moving very rapidly all the time. The other challenge here is with the other moving parts that are external to Kubernetes, things like NetApp storage, you have to kind of have like a wedge to to drive in there to kind of bridge the gap for those things.

00;04;39;28 – 00;04;55;18
Justin Parisi
So you have things like the CSI drivers and that sort of thing that have to be customized for the specific storage providers. Or, you know, if you have other things that are trying to plug into the Kubernetes cluster, you have to kind of consider that as well. And that can be a challenge in and of itself as well, right?

00;04;56;03 – 00;05;19;15
Yves Weisser
Oh, yeah, definitely. And if you go back in history four years ago, CSI did not exist. Trident did exist. Trident was actually born almost six years ago and it was the very first of its kind being dynamic provisioner for storage, for Kubernetes. And also, if you remember, storage was the number one challenge in Kubernetes for three years in a row.

00;05;19;15 – 00;05;43;01
Yves Weisser
It was basically the black sheep of Kubernetes storage. It was “Ew I don’t want that.” That’s one of the reasons why NetApp actually invested in creating Trident and made it open source and supported by NetApp. Trident was really the glue that made storage consumption transparent and easy for Kubernetes users. And that’s why I like to call it Trident the G.O.A.T. – the greatest of all time.

00;05;44;17 – 00;05;45;11
Yves Weisser
Well, yes, actually.

00;05;45;13 – 00;05;53;21
Justin Parisi
Especially for for NetApp storage right I mean, it is kind of pigeonholed with NetApp storage. You really can’t use Trident to provision other storage systems, correct?

00;05;53;23 – 00;05;54;06
Yves Weisser
Yes.

00;05;54;11 – 00;05;59;29
Justin Parisi
Yeah. So I mean, if you’re using NetApp and Kubernetes, you definitely should be looking at Trident as a serious option there.

00;06;00;19 – 00;06;01;21
Yves Weisser
Yeah, definitely.

00;06;01;21 – 00;06;20;28
Justin Parisi
That said, there are new CSI drivers being developed. You can do NFS storage without Trident. It just gets a little more complicated. It’s not as integrated. And with that integration with Trident, we can do other things like kick off snapshots or SnapMirrors or backups and that sort of thing. So Yves, tell me a little bit about the NetApp solutions that can kind of handle that sort of thing.

00;06;21;05 – 00;06;53;19
Yves Weisser
Trident is taking care of volumes and a bunch of stuff around it. Like you mentioned, snapshots. Yes, Trident can integrate CSI snapshots, so Kubernetes snapshots with ONTAP and systems. However, if you want to have a broader view, if you want to protect your application and not only the storage – by application, I mean every single little Kubernetes resource that compose your application. Here, you can look into Astra Control ,because Astra Control is really the tool you need to protect everything near your application.

00;06;53;19 – 00;07;27;29
Yves Weisser
You can snapshot, you can backup, you can restore, you can clone and you can integrate it with SnapMirror in the latest issue of Astra Control. And that is really a key differentiator. That is to me, because when I see that, you can mirror your application from a datacenter, an on-prem Kubernetes cluster, mirror it to a to Google or Azure or Amazon using SnapMirror to protect ONTAP, that I think that’s really amazing because with just one click, you can just fire up the disaster recovery environment in the cloud or vice versa, actually.

00;07;27;29 – 00;07;52;10
Justin Parisi
You’re talking about Astra Control and that can handle both on-prem and cloud storage. So when we’re talking about Kubernetes in general, there’s generally is really just two main ways of doing it. There’s the roll your own, which is standing up, cluster all by yourself and doing the on-prem releases and that sort of thing, or using something like a Kubernetes engine, like a Rancher or a GKE or an AKS.

00;07;52;29 – 00;08;05;07
Justin Parisi
What have you found most people are doing these days? Like I know the early days, they’re probably rolling their own a lot. Are they moving more towards those engines or are they still trying to stand up their own clusters because they think it’s more cost effective?

00;08;05;07 – 00;08;27;07
Yves Weisser
I think there is also a geographical parameter to take into account here. But amongst the customers I talk to and I see I would say that for quite a long period of time, I would see a venue like Kubernetes or the standard default open source Kubernetes on the markets and a lot of OpenShift also. That was really the two orchestrators that we see the most.

00;08;27;11 – 00;08;59;11
Yves Weisser
However, recently I have seen a good increase of Tanzu footprint also. That’s mostly for datacenter. For cloud environments, I would say that I believe that Amazon yeah AWS and AKS is still the most widely used out there. I don’t have the latest numbers but I guess it all depends to the customers you talk to my mostly work on-premises and are starting to think about a multi hybrid environment also.

00;08;59;11 – 00;09;03;14
Yves Weisser
So starting from data center and moving to the cloud cloud single.

00;09;04;04 – 00;09;21;18
Justin Parisi
And that will introduce all new sorts of challenges, right? Like migrating data and getting that stuff into the cloud, but doing it cost effectively and that’s going to be hard to accomplish. Now, I know NetApp has some solutions for cloud that help control those costs. Have you dealt with any of those in your experience?

00;09;21;23 – 00;09;48;02
Yves Weisser
Well, to control costs, well, there are many ways to translate cost control. I guess using SnapMirror to move data is also a way to efficiently control costs. Somehow. Maybe not directly, but somehow, yes. However, if you are talking about controlling cost at the at the resource level or the compute or the memory, Spot is also the set of tools to look into.

00;09;48;03 – 00;10;19;19
Yves Weisser
It’s harder to actually know what you need. The thing with the hyperscalars or the cloud in general is that it’s easy to use. You just click on a button and you get something and you don’t necessarily have to pay attention. Even you should pay attention to what you pay for at the end of the day, end of the month, you may get bills that are way ahead of what you thought you would have, and that’s where Spot could help because Spot will really help you optimize how you consume resources in the cloud for Kubernetes and for your stuff, but for Kubernetes specifically.

00;10;19;22 – 00;10;42;23
Justin Parisi
So with Kubernetes, you mentioned there’s a lot of moving parts. And when you have a lot of moving parts, there’s a lot of opportunity to break things, whether by typing something in wrong or forgetting a step in your configuration. There are automation suites out there to help with that. What are you finding most people are using to manage their Kubernetes clusters via automation?

00;10;42;23 – 00;10;50;24
Yves Weisser
Well, that’s a tough one, I have to say. I have not seen two customers doing the same things, using the same tools.

00;10;50;24 – 00;11;00;16
Justin Parisi
So so our most people, you know, creating their own things or are they, you know, using a suite like Ansible or Puppet or Chef, or is it just like a hodgepodge.

00;11;01;01 – 00;11;28;26
Yves Weisser
When OpenShift is in place, the easiest shortcut is to use Ansible for the good reason that in the same house, right? So yeah. When it comes to automation and I want OpenShift Ansible is the natural tool to go with, but that’s still a lot datacenter oriented when we look into cloud stuff, it’s more about TerraForm. Both are not automatic you can use TerraForm with Ansible and vice versa.

00;11;29;13 – 00;11;33;08
Yves Weisser
But I would say that both tools are still the ones you see the most today.

00;11;33;12 – 00;11;35;16
Justin Parisi
So TerraForm and Ansible, you’re seeing the most.

00;11;36;07 – 00;11;42;02
Yves Weisser
Yeah, yeah. So some people like to do everything by hand or script API also, but and these are the hardcore ones.

00;11;42;26 – 00;11;52;07
Justin Parisi
It’s funny because like, you know, this is an industry that is built on standards, but yet no one wants to standardize. So everyone has to be their own special flower, right?

00;11;53;00 – 00;12;12;20
Yves Weisser
Yeah, yeah, yeah. Also what is quite difficult, especially when you start, you are day one. You want to open a new Kubernetes service in your company. You’re alone, you know, you don’t know where to start. You look at the CNCF landscape and then you fall from the chair because it’s so wide. Yeah, so many tools that you don’t know where to start.

00;12;13;00 – 00;12;30;28
Yves Weisser
That’s where it’s good to either get help from experienced people or partners, or even us, to orient customers on the right choice are the four. What tools are needed are used for what use case using the right tool for the way for the right thing. It’s difficult, especially with the Kubernetes.

00;12;30;28 – 00;12;50;18
Justin Parisi
Yeah, I’m doing a video series on similar challenges there, trying to kind of unpack all the challenges as I learn Kubernetes myself. And it really is a wide array of things out there. And it’s funny because you’ll go to a page and you’re like, Oh, this looks really good. Then you start digging into it. You realize it hasn’t been updated since like 2018.

00;12;51;04 – 00;13;11;20
Justin Parisi
And you know, I can’t use this anymore because it’s way too old, but maybe you’ve gotten too deep and you’ve already started using it. Yeah. So that’s that’s a challenge unto itself. That said, there are pages out there, they get updated pretty frequently and one of those is your GitHub repository. So let’s talk about that. Like tell me about that, how that started and what sort of things you have there.

00;13;11;23 – 00;13;42;16
Yves Weisser
It started four years ago. I check the data earlier today. Following the hands on labs that we were doing at the time, since I was at same time learning about Kubernetes, I thought it would be a good idea for me to write down what I what I was actually learning and using. And I thought that Kubernetes is what it’s all about community, right? So why not actually share what I’m doing while I am learning? That’s where I started creating this GitHub repository.

00;13;42;16 – 00;14;30;20
Yves Weisser
With everything I was doing. I would say that in NetApp we have something called the Lab on Demand, which is also available for customers under the name of Hands on labs. For NetApp, it is lod.netapp.com. and for customers it is H-O-L, I believe .netapp.com. With this lab you can really test Trident and everything it can offer. You already have a guide provided with this lab but I would say that if you take a quick look at my GitHub repository, you will go further not only with things about Trident, but also tools you can integrate with it and how to control stuff and how to run performance benchmark and how to I don’t know how to differentiate different protocols and when to use them if I want, and so on.

00;14;30;20 – 00;14;53;17
Yves Weisser
And so up to today, I’ve got about 21 different scenarios to test everything about Trident, basically, everything. I keep it up to date. I frequently bring new stuff when the lab on demand changes or when there is a new version of Trident, I also put it there. It’s a good place to learn stuff about Trident

00;14;53;17 – 00;15;01;03
Justin Parisi
And also NetApp. I mean, you got some NetApp specific stuff in here, things that you wouldn’t necessarily think about if you’re a Kubernetes admin.

00;15;01;05 – 00;15;24;05
Yves Weisser
True. Yeah, they stuff to learn for Kubernetes users and NetApp admins and vice versa. Historically Kubernetes users who didn’t know about storage and maybe didn’t care what storage and vice versa. Also today, Kubernetes admins sometimes are afraid of Kubernetes because they don’t really understand it. They want to control everything. They don’t want to share. So and there is no real reason to be afraid.

00;15;24;20 – 00;15;37;22
Yves Weisser
You just need to be advised. I would say. And so here on this repository, you will find different information in how to well control storage consumption. For one thing at least, and many other topics.

00;15;38;00 – 00;15;49;14
Justin Parisi
Yeah. And it looks like you’ve got things where you basically set things up from scratch, set up a Kubernetes cluster from scratch, install Trident adding nodes to cluster. So lots of good tutorials there for people who maybe are just getting started with Kubernetes.

00;15;49;23 – 00;16;01;15
Yves Weisser
And also it’s not just throwing commands in there. I’m just really describing everything, inviting everything down so you can really read this GitHub repository is like a book, basically.

00;16;02;05 – 00;16;19;16
Justin Parisi
Yeah, yeah. It’s really good. I wish I had found this when I was first starting out. I can’t tell you how many how much time I spent just trying to install Kubernetes from different blogs and stuff. Right. So I mean, again, that comes back to that challenge of being open source and the information not always being readily available repositories being old and stale.

00;16;20;09 – 00;16;38;28
Justin Parisi
So yeah, I ran into a lot of problems. Sometimes it was because the information wasn’t there, sometimes because I didn’t read correctly. But yeah, I mean, it really can be a headache. And I think that’s really why a lot of people are starting to look more seriously at the engines that do this for them because you’re less mistake prone at that point.

00;16;39;07 – 00;17;06;18
Yves Weisser
True. Yeah. If you use the tool to help you deploy Kubernetes, it’s true that you remove a lot of headaches and late nights. But I would say that if you have an issue somewhere and you have to troubleshoot, so you have to know what’s under the hood unless you deploy the right tooling to help you troubleshoot. But sometimes some people would like to know how things work, and I guess I am one of these only looking at how the different certificates work with Kubernetes.

00;17;06;18 – 00;17;08;14
Yves Weisser
That’s really quite a headache.

00;17;09;11 – 00;17;26;10
Justin Parisi
Yeah, the certificate piece is pretty complicated at times. For me. I wanted to stand it up from scratch because of that. I wanted to learn from scratch. I wanted to learn where things might break, you know, what new things I might run into that other people haven’t run into, and then I document them as well. I’m like, Oh, hey, there’s this problem.

00;17;26;10 – 00;17;42;05
Justin Parisi
Like so, so for example, I noticed in yours you’re talking about adding a node and you do the kubectl join or whatever, and I did that same thing. But what I did was I stood my cluster up. I just kind of left it alone for like a couple of days and came back to it and tried to add the node.

00;17;42;05 – 00;17;49;16
Justin Parisi
And I tried to run that same command it gives you when you first do that. And I didn’t know this, but those certificates expire after 24 hours.

00;17;49;28 – 00;17;51;28
Yves Weisser
Yeah.

00;17;51;28 – 00;18;05;18
Justin Parisi
So I’m like, What’s going on? So you have to actually regenerate that certificate, right? So the little things like that that don’t show up because I don’t use it the same way everyone else uses it and everyone doesn’t use it the same way. Everyone does it differently. Some people, you know, get distracted and go do other things, right.

00;18;06;00 – 00;18;12;29
Justin Parisi
So there are different, you know, use cases, there are different corner cases that come up that I like to have documented as well.

00;18;13;02 – 00;18;17;29
Yves Weisser
That’s exactly why I created this GitHub. For myself but for others also.

00;18;18;01 – 00;18;33;27
Justin Parisi
Yeah, yes, it’s good. Everybody learns from each other. So, you know, if you if you had two things when you first started Kubernetes deployments and learning, if you could go back in time and say, “Yves, these are the two things you need to remember before you start doing this,” what were those two things?

00;18;33;28 – 00;18;57;23
Yves Weisser
The first one is write everything down. Everything. If it’s wrong, if it’s right, write it down. Because sooner or later, you’re going to need this very specific point you wrote down and you don’t remember where because you’ve seen some error already. So yeah, it’s note everything down. That’s the first step. And remember where you write it down. So that’s a that’s a second. The second advice.

00;18;58;19 – 00;19;01;18
Justin Parisi
Step one, write it down. Step two, remember where you wrote it down.

00;19;02;03 – 00;19;02;14
Yves Weisser
Yeah.

00;19;03;25 – 00;19;23;14
Justin Parisi
It’s good advice. I agree with those two things. I’d add one: read. Like don’t skip over things like read before you do stuff or if you if you like it breaking first so you can figure out why it broke, then just do it and then read. But ultimately it’s going to always come back to you missed something somewhere you didn’t read it.

00;19;23;25 – 00;19;41;07
Justin Parisi
Like for for me it was the I was using a blog based on a specific version of Ubuntu. I was trying to use the newest version of Ubuntu. You’d think that would work. It did not work and I was pounding away at, I’m like, “you know, let me go back and try this other version of Ubuntu. Oh, it worked.”

00;19;41;26 – 00;19;54;18
Justin Parisi
And then you did because my nodes, they would just keep restarting, like the services would just keep your restarting – the containers, the pods? Like restart, restart, restart hundreds of restarts, like what’s going on here. All it was was different Ubuntu version…

00;19;54;18 – 00;20;03;24
Yves Weisser
I know how it feels. So yeah. So third note: read the blogs or the documentation that is linked to the version of Kubernetes and OS you’re using. Yes.

00;20;04;13 – 00;20;20;00
Justin Parisi
Don’t try to get cute unless you want to. Unless you think you could fix it. These are written for these specific versions for specific reasons. They don’t usually tell you the reasons, but they “hey, I did this on these versions, use these” and definitely do that unless they’re like ancient versions that you can’t use anymore.

00;20;20;15 – 00;20;39;11
Yves Weisser
Yeah, that’s also why I like the Lab on Demand because it’s all virtual. If I break something, it’s mine. I can just close it and we start anew. And if I was using a Kubernetes cluster that was shared among colleagues or teams, I would be much more precautious, I would say, and pay attention to what I do. Every single company that would be scared of breaking something.

00;20;39;11 – 00;20;45;27
Yves Weisser
And like I said earlier, there is no better way to learn about Kubernetes than by breaking stuff and rebuilding.

00;20;46;25 – 00;20;58;11
Justin Parisi
Yeah, I agree. So we opened the podcast with you in French and that was funny, but it was also because you guys have your own podcast that you do, right? So tell me a little bit about that, how that started and what you guys do with that.

00;20;58;11 – 00;21;02;12
Yves Weisser
It’s called Le Podcast NetApp. That’s pretty easy.

00;21;03;09 – 00;21;04;06
Justin Parisi
Even easy for me.

00;21;04;25 – 00;21;30;08
Yves Weisser
Yeah, it started like I did a discussion around the table at the office and we were like, You, why not start something? It was, I think, late 2020, the three of us started discussing and exchanging what we could showcase and talk about what’s in a podcast. We have usually a monthly issue. Obviously during the summer it’s a little bit different, but aside from summer it’s a monthly cadence.

00;21;30;08 – 00;21;46;18
Yves Weisser
We often have people we invite, so colleagues, partners to talk about different topics. It can be Astra, it can be data protection, cloud and anything actually. So yeah and it’s also a lot of fun.

00;21;46;25 – 00;21;58;24
Justin Parisi
Yeah. I see you guys are having a lot of fun out there. You’re actually taking it out to the countryside and like going on the road, you’re not stuck in a dank old basement like I am. That’s pretty good. I like that. And you you a video as well, right? It’s like it’s so it’s not just an audio version.

00;21;58;28 – 00;22;08;00
Yves Weisser
Yeah. It’s true that we did an introduction of the podcast in the first winter in the countryside and with the dog and it was fun also.

00;22;08;01 – 00;22;21;18
Justin Parisi
So yeah, yeah. You guys have a lot of fun with that and it’s great to see. You know, it’s funny because I’ll see podcasts come around with NetApp and I look at I’m like, okay, let’s see how long these guys last. Because I guess it’s it’s a hard thing to do. It’s a hard thing to keep up with.

00;22;21;18 – 00;22;34;26
Justin Parisi
You have to keep the topics going. You have to get the guests involved. And, you know, it can be a challenge. And I think a monthly cadence is perfect because that doesn’t make you have too much pressure. It’s like allows you to kind of collect yourselves and get it together.

00;22;34;26 – 00;22;40;04
Yves Weisser
Yeah, we have had almost 25 sessions already, so we try to continue with the topic.

00;22;40;10 – 00;22;45;28
Justin Parisi
We’ll include a link to that as well in the in the blog here. So I don’t know if there’s anything else you want to cover Yves?

00;22;46;03 – 00;23;07;28
Yves Weisser
Well, check out my GitHub. I would say I will have new scenarios pretty soon. Probably more oriented about Astra Control Center because we also have a Lab on Demand for that. If you would like to see specific demos of Trident or Astra Control that could fit into this repository, don’t hesitate to come back to me and I will work on it.

00;23;08;07 – 00;23;11;06
Justin Parisi
And if we wanted to contact you again, what’s the best way to do that?

00;23;11;13 – 00;23;24;01
Yves Weisser
The easiest way is probably by sending me an email, on yves.weisser@netapp.com. You can find me on LinkedIn, GitHub, Twitter, even. There are many ways to find me.

00;23;24;01 – 00;23;48;19
Justin Parisi
Yeah, it’s funny email still can, you know, kind of continues to be the standard de facto way to reach people because people are always checking their email. They’re not always checking their social media, their LinkedIn, their GitHub, whatever, right? So for for quicker response, it’s always best to do email. Yves, again, thank you for joining us and talking to us about your GitHub repo and all your Kubernetes work. Keep it up, man. Really good work. Appreciate you joining us.

00;23;49;05 – 00;23;50;15
Yves Weisser
Thank you. Thank you for the invitation.

00;23;50;21 – 00;24;02;06
Justin Parisi
All right. That music tells me it’s time to go. If you’d like to get in touch. Send us an email, at podcast@netapp.com or send us a tweet @NetApp. As always, if you’d like to subscribe, find us on iTunes.

00;24;02;10 – 00;24;08;09
Justin Parisi
Spotify, Google Play, iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or via techontappodcast.com.

00;24;08;16 – 00;24;21;15
Justin Parisi
If you liked the show today, leave us a review. On behalf of the entire TechONTAP podcast team, I’d like to thank Yves Weisser for joining us today. As always, thanks for listening.

00;24;21;15 – 00;24;30;04
Speaker 3


00;24;34;28 – 00;24;51;21
Speaker 3

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