Using NABox for NetApp Performance Monitoring on Microsoft Hyper-V

If you’ve ever tried to install and configure Grafana, you’ll find that it’s not the easiest thing to use. Simply installing it and getting it to work right can be challenging, and when you factor in adding NetApp monitoring in using Harvest, it gets a bit more complicated.

There are some fairly good step-by-step configuration guides out there, such as this one on the NetApp communities, as well as this blog by Dan Burkland (@dburkland) that uses Docker to containerize NetApp Harvest.

There’s also a regularly updated .ova file called “NABox” that uses an “all-in-one” approach to deploying a monitoring VM. This was created/is managed by current NetApp employee Yann Bizeul (@ybontap).

This was the approach I used recently.

NABox uses .ova files, as mentioned, which are proprietary to VMware deployments. The .ova file is essentially a compressed file with:

  • .mf file
  • .ovf file
  • two .vmdk disks

The .ovf is an XML file that contains the configuration of the VM – stuff like processors, RAM, network, etc.

The .mf file is basically a checksum of the files you get in the .ova.

The VMDKs are the disks you attach to the VM.

Deploy NABox in Hyper-V

Deploying the .ova is easy when you use VMware and covered on the NABox documentation page. But currently, there are no steps to use the image with Hyper-V. That’s where this blog comes in. (you likely can port these steps over to other virtualization technologies)

This section basically replaces “Deploying the OVA” on the NABox site.

  1. Download the latest NABox .ova, the NetApp SDK and NetApp Harvest
  2. Use your favorite zip tool to extract the files from the .ova (I use 7zip)
  3. Convert the .vmdk files to Hyper-V compatible .vhd using VirtualBox(as described in this blog). These are the commands I used/the results.
    PS C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox> .\VBoxManage.exe clonemedium --format vhd C:\Users\parisi\Downloads\NAbox-2.6.1\NAbox-2.6.1-disk1.vmdk C:\Users\parisi\Downloads\NAbox-2.6.1\NAbox-2.6.1-disk1.vhd
    0%...10%...20%...30%...40%...50%...60%...70%...80%...90%...100%
    Clone medium created in format 'vhd'. 
    UUID: b6608a15-c334-49a7-9416-80ce516efea4PS 
    
    C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox> .\VBoxManage.exe clonemedium --format vhd C:\Users\parisi\Downloads\NAbox-2.6.1\NAbox-2.6.1-disk2.vmdk C:\Users\parisi\Downloads\NAbox-2.6.1\NAbox-2.6.1-disk2.vhd
    0%...10%...20%...30%...40%...50%...60%...70%...80%...90%...100%
    Clone medium created in format 'vhd'. UUID: def48aad-4e6c-4475-80d5-f145c5153e97
  4. Open the .ovf file in your XML editor of choice. I used Notepad++.
  5. Find the RAM requirements and processor count.
    <Item>
       <rasd:AllocationUnits>hertz * 10^6</rasd:AllocationUnits>
       <rasd:Description>Number of Virtual CPUs</rasd:Description>
       <rasd:ElementName>2 virtual CPU(s)</rasd:ElementName>
       <rasd:InstanceID>1</rasd:InstanceID>
       <rasd:ResourceType>3</rasd:ResourceType>
       <rasd:VirtualQuantity>2</rasd:VirtualQuantity>
    </Item>
    <Item>
       <rasd:AllocationUnits>byte * 2^20</rasd:AllocationUnits>
       <rasd:Description>Memory Size</rasd:Description>
       <rasd:ElementName>2048MB of memory</rasd:ElementName>
       <rasd:InstanceID>2</rasd:InstanceID>
       <rasd:ResourceType>4</rasd:ResourceType>
       <rasd:VirtualQuantity>2048</rasd:VirtualQuantity>
    </Item>
  6. Create a new Hyper-V VM with the same number of processors and same amount of RAM as specified in the .ovf
  7. Attach the disk 1 and disk2 .vhd files to the Hyper-V VM.
  8. Power on the VM and configure as described in NABox Basic Configuration.
  9. Finish the rest of the steps listed on the NABox page.

That’s it! Now you, too, can have a running instance of NetApp Harvest running on Microsoft Hyper-V in less than 30 minutes!

naboxhyperv

Behind the Scenes: Episode 240 – NetApp ONTAP S3

Welcome to the Episode 240, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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In this podcast episode,  NetApp StorageGRID has long been the go-to solution for S3 when dealing with the NetApp portfolio. But, due to popular demand, S3 is now in ONTAP as a public preview!

NetApp’s StorageGRID’s Senior Director and Object Store PM Duncan Moore (@NCdunc, dmoore@netapp.com) joins us, along with StorageGRID Solutions Architect Luke Mun (@lukamun, luke.mun@netapp.com), ONTAP S3 PM James Hunter (@jameshunter, james.hunter@netapp.com) and TME John Lantz (john.lantz@netapp.com), as we discuss the ins and outs of ONTAP S3 and where it fits alongside StorageGRID in the NetApp object storage solution portfolio.

Check out the ONTAP S3 TR here:

TR-4814: S3 Public Preview ONTAP 9.7

Note: LIST bucket was mentioned as unsupported in ONTAP 9.7; support for it has been added to 9.7P2.

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 240: NetApp ONTAP S3 – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Tech ONTAP Podcast · Episode 240 – NetApp ONTAP S3

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 239 – NetApp and Red Hat Summit 2020

Welcome to the Episode 239, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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In this podcast episode, Red Hat joins us to discuss this year’s virtual Red Hat Summit 2020, as well as the partnership with NetApp. And Sully the Monster makes a triumphant return!

sully-hearye

Joining us:

  • Nick Wallace, ISV Partner Alliance Manager, Red Hat (@nickalausw)
  • Andrew Sullivan, Principal Technical Marketing Manager, Cloud Platforms, Red Hat (@practicalAndrew)
  • Mark Cates, Principal Product Manager – HCI Solutions, NetApp (@cicurios)

For more information, see:

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 239: NetApp and Red Hat Summit 2020

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

UNSUBSCRIBE! Tips for de-cluttering your Outlook work inbox

If you’ve ever used Outlook at your workplace, you’ve undoubtedly been in “reply-all” Hell, where someone sends an email to several distribution lists with thousands of users  on it, and then the thread keeps going – either with valid replies, bad jokes/puns or with numerous emails from desperate people wanting to be removed from the thread.

unsubscribe-lemmings

(And yes, this was spawned by a recent occurrence of this)

  • UNSUBSCRIBE!
  • Take me off this list!
  • Please remove me!
  • Please use bcc!

startrek-picard-facepalm-700x341

There’s not a catch all way to avoid this, but you can be assured that you are *not* completely helpless when you’re caught in the deluge.

Here are some Outlook tips/tricks that I use to keep my inbox as clutter-free as possible, as well as email etiquette you can use as a sender.

These tips mostly cover Microsoft Outlook thick client on Windows. If you have additional tips, or tips for Mac Outlook/O365 (or other email clients) comment below!

Etiquette for Senders

If you’re planning on *sending* to a distribution list, try to keep in mind that you might be guilty of the very offenses that might annoy you. So, try to think before you blast off that mass email.

Consider your audience

Your email is likely targeted to a select group of people.  So that means you probably don’t need to send it to 10 different distribution lists – and you almost *certainly* don’t need to send it to the entire company. In fact, smart companies prevent most employees from sending emails to the largest DLs.

Try to send only to 2-3 DLs at most, and make sure they are your targeted audience.

Check the numbers

How many people are in that distribution list? Not sure? Sometimes, Outlook will show you in plain sight:

dl-numbers

If there isn’t a field there, you can go to the DL’s properties to see who is a member of the group.

ng-all-properties

Do you need people to “Reply all” to this message?

As a sender, you might be able control whether people can reply all to your email with permissions in Outlook. This article covers it:

Preventing Reply All

(If your organization isn’t using IRM, this won’t work.)

Using “blind copy” (bcc)

This one is tricky; if you use it, then replies only go to you. But it also will break rules for users that filter emails to folders and end up in their inbox. If that’s your intent (as in, forcing someone to see your email rather than it going to a rule) then by all means do it, you evil, evil person. But it’s something to keep in mind; using the reply all permissions is a better option for everyone, IMO.

Tips for Controlling Your Inbox

While some people may not be aware of the tricks for senders (or are and just don’t care), you are not helpless as someone who gets email. There are ways to control your inbox, even if you’re on a Mac.

Tired of a thread? Ignore it!

In Windows Outlook, if you’re sick of a thread, you can click the “Ignore” button, which basically redirects all emails from that conversation to the Delete folder.

email-ignore

Subscribed to multiple DLs? Use your rules!

Outlook provides methods to filter emails based on a variety of things; keywords, subjects, senders, etc. I like to filter by the DLs things get sent to. These get filtered to specific folders I created, rather than cluttering up my inbox.

This does two things:

  • Keeps things organized
  • Keeps me sane

Creating a rule is easy. In fact, you can create one from an email that you receive by clicking on the little icon in the “Move” section.

create-rule

One issue here is that if someone sends an email with the DL you set a rule for in BCC, the rule won’t work. There are workarounds, but they’re not always ideal.

Use Quick Steps!

Outlook has a way to create actions that you can trigger with the push of a button called “Quick Steps.” This is a more manual process, but it helps if you get bcc’d on emails.

quick-steps

As you can see, I’ve created several Quick Steps. My “Support” quick step will move the email I run it on to a folder called “Support.” I don’t use these a ton, but if I get emails from people not on DLs and I don’t want to filter them all but want to keep for later, I can create one of these.

quick-steps-edit

One use case that comes to mind is for my technical report (TR) writing; sometimes I see an interesting thread or a frequently asked question that I need to put into the next TR update. I usually manually move that message, which can be cumbersome since I have so many folders I use to filter. With a quick step, I can just click a button to move it.

UNSUBSCRIBE (no, seriously)!

One of the most unintentionally hilarious results of a “reply all” storm is the mass of “reply all” emails that all want to be removed from the DL. For one, that doesn’t work – no one is going to remove you and emailing the DL with that reply doesn’t automatically do it. Second, you might not have total control over removing yourself; sometimes, an email has been sent to a larger DL (like all employees) and you’re a member of one of the thousand sub-groups in that DL. Removing you from the group removes you from other possibly important emails.

You likely have a way to remove yourself from a DL, but you need to check with your email admins or IT organization to do that. At my company, we have KB articles on how to do it, and a nice web-based group management interface to add/remove ourselves from groups. Some email servers allow you to send an email to a DL you want to subscribe or unsubscribe to with specific subject lines. Again, check with your IT admins.

Junk mail

Most email administrators employ some fashion of spam filtering. However, these things can’t block everything, so it’s up to you at that point.

If you are getting frequent spam, make it a habit to use the “Junk mail/block sender” options. Otherwise, you’ll keep getting those emails.

block-sender

You can manage your junk mail settings, including the email addresses on the blocked/allowed lists with “Junk E-Mail Options.” (I’m including the blocked senders, because those spammers are annoying)

junk-options2   junk-options

(Not) Junk mail

One thing I forget often is that, sometimes, our corporate spam filter is *too* effective. I’ll sign up for an account somewhere and it gets filtered into junk. After the 2nd or 3rd “forgot my login” request gets put there, I finally remember to check the junk folder. So, it makes sense to occasionally check there to see if anything got put there incorrectly, and then whitelist it by marking it “not junk.”

Got any tips?

Do you have any things you do with your email management? If so, add to the comments!

Behind the Scenes: Episode 238 – NetApp Zero Trust Solutions

Welcome to the Episode 238, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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In this podcast episode, NetApp security PM Juan Mojica (@juan_m_mojica) and TME Dan Tulledge (@dan_tulledge) join us to tell us about how NetApp helps enterprises architect a zero-trust security solution with ONTAP.

For more information, see:

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 238: NetApp Zero Trust – Podcast Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 237 – Iguazio

Welcome to the Episode 237, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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This week on the podcast, Iguazio’s CTO Yaron Haviv (@yaronhaviv) and VP of Business Development Ori Lev Ran (oril@iguazio.com) join NetApp’s Sr. Solutions Manager of AI, Hoseb Dermanilian (@HosebDM) and myself to talk about Iguazio (@Iguazio) and where they fit in the AI/ML landscape.

To see a demo of Iguazio:

https://tv.netapp.com/detail/video/6149623013001

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 237: Iguazio – Podcast Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 236 – How NVIDIA, NetApp and AI in Healthcare Can Help Fight the COVID-19 Pandemic

Welcome to the Episode 236, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week on the podcast,  Dr. Mona Flores, (https://www.linkedin.com/in/monagflores/) the Global Lead for Hospitals and Clinical Partnerships from NVIDIA, joins NetApp’s Healthcare Business Development Manager Esteban Ruebens (@esteban_aihc) to discuss how NetApp and NVIDIA are teaming up to help healthcare professionals use AI, as well as how AI is being used to combat the COVID-19 pandemic.

Also, related this week, NetApp’s CEO George Kurian spoke about NetApp’s response to the pandemic on Fox Business:

https://video.foxbusiness.com/v/6146651560001/#sp=show-clips

For more information:

https://www.netapp.com/us/data-visionary/hannover-medical-school-fights-lung-disease-with-data.aspx

https://www.corescientific.com/news/core-scientific-offers-free-access-covid-19-research

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 236: How NVIDIA, NetApp and AI in Healthcare Can Help Fight the COVID-19 Pandemic – Podcast Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 235 – NetApp MAX Data and Intel Whitepaper

Welcome to the Episode 235, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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This week on the podcast, we discuss the new collaborative white paper between NetApp and Intel on MAX Data. NetApp’s Mr. Memory Chris Gebhardt (@chrisgeb) and Intel’s Sridhar Kayathi (sridhar.r.kayathi@intel.com) join us to elaborate, as well as to myth-bust some of the thinking around what qualifies as storage class memory.

The new MAX Data white paper can be found here:

Maximize Database Performance with NetApp and Persistent Memory

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and-technology/optane-technology/netapp-max-data.html

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 235: NetApp MAX Data and Intel Whitepaper – Podcast Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Mounting ONTAP CIFS/SMB shares with Linux – Guidelines and tips

Every now and then, the question of mounting CIFS/SMB shares in ONTAP using Linux clients comes up. Many people might consider this configuration to be a crime against nature.

garbodor

If you’re asking yourself “why would someone want to do this,” there are a few reasons.

  • Lock handling – SMB locks use oplocks. NFS locks use shared locks or delegations, depending on the NFS version and options being used. Generally this is fine, but in some cases, the style of lock might create complications with some applications. For example, Kafka on NFS has some issues with how NFS handles deletions when a file is locked:
    https://blog.usejournal.com/kafka-on-kubernetes-a-good-fit-95251da55837?gi=91867e828261
  • Legacy copiers/scanners – Many companies will use copiers/scanners to create image files that redirect to a NAS share in their environment. Many of those copiers use old SMB clients and are no longer under support, so they can’t be upgrades. And many of those scanners/copiers are expensive, so people aren’t interested in buying newer ones just to get newer SMB versions.
  • “How we’ve always done it” – This is a common reason that doesn’t always have technical logic associated with it, but you still have to roll with it.

There are other reasons out there as well, I’m sure. But this post will attempt to group the considerations, support statements and issues you might see in case someone else has that question.

Mounting SMB shares in ONTAP – General Guidelines

In 7-Mode ONTAP, mounting SMB shares with clients like AIX had no issues. This was because 7-Mode supported a lot of old SMB technology concepts that newer versions of ONTAP have deprecated. Even though SMB shares on Linux worked in 7-Mode, there was never an official supported configuration for it.

NetApp ONTAP has traditionally only supported Apple OS and Windows OS for CIFS/SMB workloads.

You can find the supported clients in the Interoperability Matrix here:

https://mysupport.netapp.com/matrix/

With newer versions of ONTAP, you *can* get SMB/CIFS working properly, provided you take the following into account:

  • CIFS/SMB clients should support UNICODE for CIFS/SMB communication. Clustered ONTAP doesn’t support non-UNICODE in any release and never will. Newer CIFS/SMB clients should support UNICODE. AIX is a good example of an older Linux client that has some challenges using SMB because it still uses non-UNICODE in some client installs.
  • CIFS/SMB versions mounting should reflect the supported SMB versions in ONTAP. ONTAP has deprecated SMB1, so you’d need to mount using SMB2 or SMB3.
  • CIFS/SMB enabled features in ONTAP should reflect the feature support for the CIFS/SMB Linux clients. For example, my Centos7 Linux Samba client doesn’t support large MTU, SMB3 encryption, multichannel, etc. That can cause failures in the mounts (for an example, see below).
  • If using Kerberos for the CIFS/SMB mounts, be sure the CIFS/SMB ONTAP server has a valid SPN for the CIFS service. The name should match the mount name. For example, if your CIFS/SMB server is named “CIFS” then the SPN would be cifs/cifs.domain.com.

Common Issues when Mounting CIFS/SMB

One of the main issues people run into with SMB mounts in Linux (provided they follow the guidelines above when using ONTAP) is using the wrong command syntax. For example, when you specify the share path, you use either \\\\name\\share (extra slashes to tell Linux that the \ isn’t an operand) or you use //name/share.

The following NetApp KB article does a good job of giving command examples for the right way to mount SMB:

How to access CIFS from Linux machine using SAMBA

Usually the command will tell you if the wrong option is being used, but sometimes the errors are less than helpful. These are a few errors I ran into.

Incorrect Mount Option

This was pretty self-explanatory. First, I didn’t have the cifs-utils installed. Second, I used the wrong command syntax.

Mount point does not exist

Again, self explanatory. The directory you’re trying to mount to needs to exist.

No such file or directory (when mounting)

This means you specified the wrong export path on the NFS server. Check your junction-paths and try again.

Host is down

This one was a tricky error, as it suggests that the server was not up. In some cases, that may truly be the issue. But it wasn’t in my case.

# mount -t cifs -o user=cifsuser \\\\DEMO\\nas /mnt/nas
Password for cifsuser@\DEMO\nas: **********
mount error(112): Host is down

But, in reality, the issue was that I didn’t specify the SMB version and it tried to use SMBv1.0 by default.

Specifying the SMB version (-o vers=3.0) got past that issue.

Required key not available

This is a Kerberos specific error. In my case, the cifs/servername.domain.com SPN didn’t exist for the hostname I used in the UNC path. You can see that in a packet capture.

Permission denied

This error is fairly useless in both Windows and Linux in a lot of cases – mainly because it can mean a variety of things. Sometimes, it really is an access issue (such as share or file-level permissions). But in my testing, I also ran into this issue when I had unsupported SMB features enabled on my CIFS server in ONTAP.

# mount -t cifs -o vers=3.0,user=administrator,domain=NTAP.LOCAL //DEMO/nas /mnt/nas
Password for administrator@//DEMO/nas: **********
mount error(13): Permission denied

In a packet trace, I could see the client telling me what it supported:

smb-capabilities

But the reply didn’t really mention the issue. So I made sure to disable the following CIFS/SMB features:

  • SMB3 encryption (cifs security modify)
  • Large MTU and SMB Multichannel (cifs options modify)

Once I did that, I was able to mount.

[root@centos7 /]# mount -t cifs -o vers=3.0,user=administrator,domain=NTAP.LOCAL //DEMO/nas /mnt/nas
Password for administrator@//DEMO/nas: **********
[root@centos7 /]# touch /mnt/nas/smbfile
[root@centos7 /]# ls -la /mnt/nas
total 1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 0 Mar 27 14:36 .
drwxr-xr-x. 9 root root 97 Mar 27 10:17 ..
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 0 Mar 27 14:36 smbfile

For Kerberos, you would just specify sec=krb5.

# mount -t cifs -o sec=krb5,vers=3.0,user=administrator,domain=NTAP.LOCAL //DEMO/nas /mnt/nas

There you go! Hopefully this helped someone from going down a Google K-hole. Leave comments or suggestions below.

Behind the Scenes: Episode 234 – NetApp Keystone

Welcome to the Episode 234, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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This week on the podcast, we discuss NetApp Keystone with Sunitha Rao (Sunitha.rao@netapp.com, @sira_10) and Jean Banko (@bankonAI) and how it is simplifying cloud consumption.

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 234: NetApp Keystone – Podcast Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here: