Behind the Scenes Episode 299: NetApp Lab on Demand Early Access Program

Welcome to the Episode 299, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, NetApp’s Lab on Demand Content Manager Brian de Loureiro stops by to tell us all about the new Early Access Program feature of the NetApp Hands on Labs.

For more information:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 299: NetApp Lab on Demand Early Access Program – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

How I got started in IT without a CS degree

I wrote something a while back for another site on this – it got archived, so I grabbed it off of the “Wayback Machine” and am re-posting it here (with some modifications/updates), as it’s a pretty common topic and has gained some new attention with Twitter conversations around whether someone in IT is “valid” without a CS degree. (Hint: They are)

Some of the best engineers I have worked with were not computer science majors. Some majored in music. Some in philosophy. Some in English. It’s entirely possible to be a competent IT person without needing a 4 year degree and mountain of debt to do it. One person I found inspiring was Tae’lur Alexis, who famously went from a fast food job into coding. The reality of the situation these days is that a) college degrees are expensive and b) your first job coming out of college isn’t likely going to be lucrative. So how do you navigate a world where college degrees are a dime a dozen and not everyone has the opportunities or foresight to get a CS degree?

What is IT?

IT stands for “information technology.” If you were to try to explain IT to your mom, you’d say “I work in computers.” But, IT is much more. It can be help desk. It could be systems administration. Maybe it’s infosec. It could be tech support. It could be programming. IT covers a lot of different areas. For me, IT has been help desk, systems administration, tech support and, now, technical marketing at a Fortune 500 company.

A little about me

Before I became the @NFSDudeAbides, I took an unlikely path into my role in IT. I went to college with all intentions of going to design school and becoming a graphic designer. But some poor planning and indecision paused that track for a year. In that time, I realized I didn’t have to spend tons of money for supplies to get a design degree. Instead, I could get work experience and major in something else, something flexible enough to fit into my goal of graphic design/marketing/advertising. The major would also be flexible enough to allow me to change careers if for some reason design didn’t work out for me.

So, I majored in English.

A real wild one

Why English? Well, my thought process was that the writing aspect was invaluable in any and all career paths. Being able to convey your thoughts intelligently in written and spoken word plays across all career paths. And the creative writing aspect of English tied in nicely with the design portion of the stuff I wanted to do.

So, my career started in college, working at a non-profit part time, doing both web and print design work. Because it was a small non-profit, I was also asked to do other things, such as helpdesk/basic PC support. That’s where my IT career began – making about 10 bucks an hour doing the jobs of several people (this is circa 2000).

Eventually the non-profit shut its doors, but not before I had picked up a 2nd job at a startup that sold posters online. In that job, I was asked to do much of the same work – web design, print design and helpdesk. But I was now getting paid more. In fact, each new job I took after my last job tended to pay more – sometimes significantly more. A combination of experience and free-market competition helps, but it’s something you can use to your advantage as you grow in your career.

I worked there for 2 years or so. In that time, the company grew and expanded. It became readily apparent that I was not going to be able to perform both design and helpdesk tasks, especially as the web design started becoming more demanding. I had to pick up ASP in addition to HTML (again, this is circa 2000). On the other side, the helpdesk role was morphing into a systems administrator role. And why not? They were paying me just 36k a year to do the work of 3 people!

Plus, they made my continued employment contingent on getting IT certifications and I had to basically twist their arm to agree to pay for it, since they were forcing me to do it. It was an important early lesson in loyalty; you may be loyal to your company, but they are almost certainly not going to be loyal to you in most cases. There are exceptions, of course, but don’t let loyalty to your job prevent you from at least exploring better opportunities.

Eventually, they needed to make some cuts and I got laid off with a number of other people. That IT certification bill? They tried to saddle me with it in the exit interview and eventually we “negotiated” them not having to pay me for my accrued vacation. Illegal? Probably. But I was in my early 20s and kind of in shock from being laid off.

Didn’t realize it at the time, but it was the best thing that ever happened to me. I went from being severely underpaid to a new job where I was making just below average salary. It was a pretty sizeable increase – nearly a 100% jump!

I did learn another lesson from the experience…

Starting out in IT is not always about money

This is especially true with the route I took. An English major trying to navigate the IT world. Fair or not, companies that hire non-CS degree employees (with no experience) are taking a risk, so they feel they can justify the lower pay. In my case, I couldn’t find a compelling argument – I wanted to be in IT and knew I didn’t have a ton of leverage.

When you look for jobs, especially at larger companies, you see a lot of “4 year degree in computer science or equivalent work experience” in the job descriptions. That’s a problem for people who did not major in an IT-specific major. In reality, it’s a weed out by companies to discourage people who probably aren’t qualified from applying, as well as a filter mechanism for HR/hiring managers to filter out resumes. If you don’t fit a keyword, you don’t get picked for an interview. So, naturally, you can imagine how frustrating it is to apply to many, many jobs and never have even a phone screen. These days, it’s evolved into “8 years experience in technology that has only existed for 5 years.” It’s tough to navigate, and it’s the classic age-old quandary of “how do you get experience without a job/how do you get a job without experience.”

A Shortcut to Experience — Impactful Coaching & Consulting

Sometimes, you have to do things you don’t want to do in order to do things you want to do later. Call it “paying your dues.” And it’s even tougher to swallow when you went to college for 4 years with the idea that you’d get a better paying job and you end up just competing with everyone else who had the same idea but got CS degrees.

Unfortunately, this is the reality you face (or at least the reality *I* faced). However, there are options…

Unpaid (or lightly paid) internships

If you are in college or looking to break into the IT field, you might look into doing some gratis work. It could be for a large company or it could be for a non-profit. It doesn’t really matter – what matters is being able to put information under “work experience” that isn’t your last gig at TGI Fridays (yes, I did some time there and wore my flair).

TGI Fridays Got Rid Of Flair Because Of Office Space - CINEMABLEND

But you’re not there just to mark a check box on your resume’. You are there to gain valuable experience and knowledge, whether it’s in fixing computers or in working well with others. I once scored a contract position at Nortel Networks, working in their labs. But, right before the contract was set to start, it was canceled because, well, Nortel was canceled. I was so desperate for the experience, I offered to do the job for free. Unfortunately, there was a company policy against free labor there, but the hiring manager was impressed with my enthusiasm and I ended up landing a 2 week gig.

This isn’t to endorse the idea that free labor/unpaid internships are great (ideally they wouldn’t be necessary), but I felt I needed the experience,

If not getting paid isn’t for you (and for some people, it’s a non-starter), then you might consider…

IT Recruiters

You can say whatever you want about recruiters (aka, headhunters) – but they can get results. In fact, my first few jobs after my first job were the direct result of IT recruiters. Having some experience up front is ideal, but they may be able to help you land some entry level contract work to help bolster your resume’. And contract work is better than no work.

Just keep in mind that recruiters are making a tidy profit off of you, so be sure you’re getting a fair share. Try to stick to more well known or established companies, if possible. They might even offer health insurance during your contract! Of course, your negotiating power will be solely contingent on your overall experience (and genuine desire for the offered job), so don’t push it. 🙂

IT Certifications/Tech schools

This is a tricky one – IT certs can be *very* expensive, as can tech schools that offer promises of lucrative careers in IT. If you’re trying to land a job, you’re probably not flush with cash and probably not looking to take on a heap of debt in the form of loans. So you have to carefully weigh your options and understand the real value of certifications and tech schools.

Certifications definitely can land you interviews and even jobs. But they don’t help you stay in those jobs, and if you manage to get a certification by cramming and memorizing answers, you will get exposed. Fast.

But it’s important to know which certifications are worth their time. For example, certifications like CompTIA A+ and Net+ are good for some jobs (like a cable technician/internet installer/low-level help desk), but they won’t necessarily land you that six figure gig as a systems architect, and honestly, are starting to age out as valid certs.

But certs from Microsoft and Cisco will be much more lucrative. And if you can do it, try to get certs in cloud from AWS, Azure, etc. They will be way more expensive, as well as harder to achieve than A++, so it becomes a balancing act – do you want to spend a ton of money, get a certification and hope you land a job later? And if you land a job, hope you don’t figure out later that you hate working in IT?

Same goes for tech schools (like ECPI). Yes, you can make decent money by getting trained at a tech school that specializes in IT jobs. But you might also find that many companies won’t even call you for an interview if they see your only IT experience is at a tech school, or even one of those for-profit online universities.

A cheaper, safer alternative? Community college. Some offer IT courses and tracks that cost way less than tech schools and allow you to really evaluate what you want to do. Even cheaper and safer? Highly accredited schools like Stanford and Michigan are actually offering online courses for FREE.

Or, if you’re of the right age, the military is a solid option for getting into whatever field you are interested it.

Do a little research ahead of time and save yourself some money. Or…

Learn on your own

Believe it or not, but there is an entire Internet out there, full of all sorts of docs, manuals and information you can get for FREE. There are operating systems you can run FOR FREE. And now, with container technology like Docker, you can use platform as a service (PaaS) as an educational tool. Know how much I learned by trying to get systemd to work with a Docker container? A ton.

Plus, you get to put stuff like “Docker” on your resume’. Hiring managers and HR folks aren’t always IT savvy, so they have keywords they use. Think Docker isn’t in some keyword searches these days?

But, education is not enough. You also have to market yourself. The main way you do that is via the resume’ and cover letter…

Marketing yourself

The cover letter and resume’ are the gateway to the soul of the gainfully employed.

This is your one chance to make an impression on your prospective employer. So, don’t be lazy about it. There are plenty of resume’ writing guidelines out there, so I won’t re-hash here. But one piece of advice I’d give is to customize your resume’ for each and every company you really are interested in. Change skills around, add or remove keywords, etc. Anything to get the interview. Same for the cover letter. And for the love of all that’s holy, don’t lie. Don’t call yourself an “expert” unless you really are an expert. You won’t like the interview questions if you claim to be an expert at something you are not. And try to avoid spelling mistakes or typos. And, of course, don’t put stuff like your address/phone number on it. Some sites even let you go incognito. This is a perfect way to weed out discriminatory employers.

The resume’ can be a Word doc or posted on a job site. In fact, post the resume’ as many places as possible.

Keep in mind there are other routes to getting interest in employment outside of the traditional resume’ and job hunt. For instance, blogging about IT can land you some interest and is useful to add to your resume’. Use social media sites like LinkedIn, Twitter, etc. Build a community. Contribute to that community – that’s a way to build a body of work. (But don’t steal other people’s work!)

It’s also a double-edged sword. You need to be cognizant that everything you say and do on social media can be mined by future employers. They will Google you. Make sure they don’t find anything that disqualifies you. Scrub your media regularly, or keep your professional profile and personal profiles separate.

And remember: the goal of a resume’/cover letter/blog is not to get the job, but to get…

The interview

You have to realize that getting an interview for a job in IT is a pretty major accomplishment. So treat it as such.

I’ve conducted plenty of interviews in my time in IT. I used to come up with a list of questions and read off of that. What I realized is that the people I interviewed had often looked at the same sites I used to use to cram for the interview. That didn’t make for effective interviews.

These days, when I interview, I go free form. I ask questions that are pretty basic and then I dig deeper and deeper into the subject to test two things: how much the candidate knows and how well they react to not knowing. I’m not necessarily looking for someone who knows it all – I’m looking for how resourceful they are and how well they react to stress.

That doesn’t happen in all interviews. Some are stock questions. Some are long logic problems. Some are just plain weird. Sites like Glassdoor actually have people posting about questions asked in interviews, which I think is kind of lame, but for someone starting out in IT, it might be useful! And as I previously mentioned, if you said you were an expert on something on your resume’, you better be an expert.

As for dress code, etc… that stuff is all covered elsewhere on the internet. Use your Google-Fu.

Hopefully, you nail the interview and land…

The job offer

If you got picked for a job out of multiple candidates, great! But you’re not done…

Now you have to negotiate. This, for me, is the hardest part of the process because I never know how much to ask for without pissing off whoever I’m dealing with. As I mentioned before, sites like Glassdoor exist to try to level the playing field a bit. They list salaries, job titles, etc. So you can get a ballpark idea of what you should be asking for. I’ve been lowballed several times in my career and likely will be again. But at least I know I’m being lowballed. 😛

The job itself

When you land a job, you want to ensure you do the best you can at staying employed. But don’t kid yourself – the first (or 2nd or 3rd) job you get probably won’t be the only one you ever have. Nor should it be… you want to move around, learn new technologies and diversify your skillset. You also want to make more money. In my personal experience, I have always gotten more money at a new job than I was able to get through raises at my previous job. It’s just the way things work – employers can’t necessarily give large merit increases (especially in down years) to employees. And new employers need to pony up to lure talent away. You will eventually find your “ideal” company, but it may take some time. Before I landed at NetApp in technical support, I never spent more than a year or two at a job. I’d either get bored or realize I didn’t like the company’s culture (or their pay). When I got to NetApp, I realized that I had found a home and was able to learn more there than I ever learned elsewhere. 15 years and still going…

Hopefully this post has shed some light on someone else’s experience. I’ll dig up my follow up to this one about Advancing in Your IT Career and post it soon…

I don’t pretend to have all the answers, and I may even have given what some consider to be bad advice. Feel free to comment below!

Behind the Scenes Episode 298: NetApp FlexPod for SAP HANA

Welcome to the Episode 298, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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This week, we learn all about the new NetApp FlexPod offering for SAP HANA from Pramod Ramamurthy of Cisco and Marco Schoen of NetApp!

For more information:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 298: NetApp FlexPod for SAP HANA – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes Episode 297: Accelerate Enterprise SAN Apps with ONTAP NVMe over FC

Welcome to the Episode 297, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, the SAN solutions team joins us to discuss how you can increase performance for enterprise SAN workloads with existing FCP hardware just by enabling a license!

We cover performance, conversion and a variety of other related topics with:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 297: Accelerate Enterprise SAN Apps with ONTAP NVMe over FC – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes Episode 296: SAN Automation with NetApp and Broadcom

Welcome to the Episode 296, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, AJ Casamento (https://www.linkedin.com/in/aj-casamento-a44570) from Broadcom joins us to discuss NetApp SAN automation with Mike Peppers (@NTAPFLIGuy) and Madhu Pai of NetApp.

For more information:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 296: SAN Automation with NetApp and Broadcom – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes Episode 295 – NetApp DataOps Toolkit

Welcome to the Episode 295, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, NetApp TME Michael Oglesby (https://www.linkedin.com/in/mboglesby) joins us to discuss data, AI/ML and the new DataOps Toolkit from NetApp!

For more information:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 295: NetApp DataOps Toolkit – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes Episode 294 – Maintaining Business Operations through Disaster in ONTAP 9.9.1

Welcome to the Episode 294, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, we discuss how SnapMirror Business Continuity (SMBC) and MetroCluster over IP in ONTAP 9.9.1 helps maintain business operations through disasters, as well as when you’d want to use one over the other.

Joining us:

  • Manish Thakur, NetApp Product Manager, MetroCluster and SnapMirror Business Continuity (manish@netapp.com)
  • Cheryl George, NetApp Technical Marketing Engineer, MetroCluster and SnapMirror Business Continuity (cheryl.george@netapp.com)

For more information on MetroCluster over IP and SnapMirror Business Continuity:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 294: Maintaining Business Operations through Disaster in ONTAP 9.9.1 – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes Episode 293 – NVMe: Disruptive Technology Brought to You Non-Disruptively by Brocade and NetApp

Welcome to the Episode 293, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, we discuss NVMe over Fibre Channel (NVMeFC) with experts from NetApp and Brocade, and how the protocol stacks up to the SCSI SAN protocols.

Joining us:

For more information on Brocade, NVMe and NetApp:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 293: NVMe – Disruptive Technology Brought to You Non-Disruptively by Brocade and NetApp – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes Episode 292 – NetApp E-Series EF300

Welcome to the Episode 292, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, Mitch Blackburn (mitch.blackburn@netapp.com) joins us to discuss the E-Series EF300 and what’s new with the E-Series line.

For more information on the E-Series:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 292: NetApp E-Series EF300 – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes Episode 291 – Introducing VMware Tanzu

Welcome to the Episode 291, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, we discuss VMware Tanzu, containers and how it all fits into the NetApp ecosystem with Myles Gray (@mylesagray) and Glenn Sizemore (@glnsize) of VMware and Chance Bingen (@CB8MyDataCenter) of NetApp.

For more information on VMware Tanzu and NetApp:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 291: Introducing VMware Tanzu – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss