Behind the Scenes: Episode 105 – Converged Systems Advisor

Welcome to the Episode 105, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

group-4-2016

This week on the podcast, we chat about converged systems like FlexPod, and how the NetApp acquisition of Immersive brought us Config Advisor for your Converged Infrastructure, Converged Systems Advisor (CSA)! Join us and Keith Barto, Director of Product Management for Converged Infrastructure Management for everything you need to know about CSA!

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

You can listen to this week’s episode here:

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Behind the Scenes: Episode 104 – NetApp E-Series Overview

Welcome to the Episode 104, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

group-4-2016

This week on the podcast, we cover a topic we’ve never before covered – E-Series! Join us as we give you an overview of what E-series is, where it best fits and what you’d use it for. We also discuss how NetApp IT uses E-Series.

Podcast guests included:

  • Todd Edwards, core E-Series TME
  • Jamal Boudi, Consulting Systems Engineer, E-Series
  • Mitch Blackburn, E-Series TME, Solutions

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

You can listen to this week’s episode here:

Ready for Insight 2017?

NetApp Insight 2017 is rapidly approaching and I’ll be making my 5th appearance. This year, I’m doing another FlexGroup session, but I’m also picking up the general ONTAP session to discuss what’s new in ONTAP 9.3, and how ONTAP is modernizing your datacenter. This is me last year at Insight, discussing FlexGroup volumes in a shorter video:

These are the session numbers and abstracts, if you’re interested in signing up on the schedule builder:

16594-2 – Accelerate Unstructured Data with FlexGroup: the Next Evolution of Scale-Out NAS

NetApp FlexGroup volumes were introduced in NetApp ONTAP 9.1 and were designed to deliver capacity and performance benefits over not only NetApp FlexVol volumes, but also over competitive solutions. This session will include an overview of what NetApp FlexGroup volumes are, how they work, where to use them and an update on the new features and functionality.

30682-2 – Modernize Your Data Center with a Sneak Peek at the Latest ONTAP 9 Improvements

NetApp ONTAP 9.2 brought a slew of improvements that have enabled NetApp customers to modernize their data management infrastructure. Come for a review of the top enhancements in ONTAP 9.2, and stay for a sneak peek at improvements likely coming soon in the next major release of ONTAP.

I’ve also created a Hands On Lab for FlexGroup volumes that any Insight attendee can sign up for and will be handing out Tech ONTAP Podcast stickers and t-shirts. This year, we have a special edition featuring artwork by Ashley McNamara:

tot-gopher

You can find them in the Social Media Hub in Insight Central.

Other sessions of interest

Here are a few other sessions you may want to check out:

  • 18544-2 – Optimize Your NetApp ONTAP 9 All Flash FAS and FAS Systems
  • 13902-2 – Securing and Hardening NetApp ONTAP 9
  • 16700-2 – FabricPool in the Real World: Configurations and Best Practices
  • 18012-2 – NetApp ONTAP SAN Best Practices
  • 12708-2 – How NVMe and Storage-Class Memory Are Reshaping the Storage Industry
  • 16944-2 – Shrink Your DMZ Infrastructure with ONTAP and Other Networking Best Practices
  • 16947-2 – Thwart Threats and Add Functionality to Your NFS Storage
  • 17323-2 – Simplifying the Transition from 10GbE to 40GbE Infrastructure
  • 17703-2 – Simplify NetApp ONTAP Operations Management with Integrated Unified Manager
  • 18576-2 – Store Your Data in the Right Place on Multiple-Storage-Tier ONTAP 9 Clusters

Also check out NetApp A-Team member Ruari McBride’s NetApp Insight blog here:

https://ruairimcbride.wordpress.com/2017/09/01/time-its-on-your-side/

Behind the Scenes: Episode 103 – vNAS using ONTAP Select

Welcome to the Episode 103, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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Former Tech ONTAP podcast host and current Virtually Speaking podcast host, Pete Flecha (@vPedroArrow), is the TME for vSAN at VMware and is always bugging me to do a show on vSAN. So, here we go!

This week on the podcast, we brought in the technical director for ONTAP Select, Peter Skovrup (skovrup@netapp.com) to discuss the latest improvements in ONTAP Select, including the ability to use ONTAP Select on VMware vSAN platforms!

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

You can listen here:

New! NetApp FlexGroup Lab on Demand

Working in the laboratory

Interested in trying out NetApp FlexGroup volumes yourself? Well, we have a new Lab on Demand available that guides you through the setup and configuration of NetApp FlexGroup volumes, as well as managing and monitoring the feature.

If you have a NetApp login and are a partner or internal employee, you can check it out here:

https://labondemand.netapp.com/catalog (log in and then search for/click on the NetApp FlexGroup Volumes in ONTAP v1.0 lab)

If you’re a customer, ping your account team for access, or check out the Lab on Demand at Insight!

While you’re there, be sure to check out other Labs on Demand!

What is Lab on Demand?

Lab on Demand is a fully automated virtualized sandbox of a multitude of NetApp technologies. You can do pretty much anything in these labs, including:

  • Setting up SnapMirror and SnapVault relationships
  • Managing Multiprotocol NAS environments using LDAP
  • Configuring and using SnapCenter
  • Using Docker and Kubernetes with NetApp
  • Testing VMware SRM Backup and Recover

And much more!

Be sure to send lab feedback to flexgroups-info@netapp.com or post to the comments here!

Behind the Scenes: Episode 102 – ONTAP Data Protection Overview

Welcome to the Episode 102, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

group-4-2016

This week on the podcast, we invited Anand Nadathur, NetApp Data Protection  Director of Product Management, and Siddharth Agrawal, Data Protection TME,  to give us an overview of some of the data protection options available in ONTAP. This is the first episode in a series of episodes that cover a variety of data protection topics. Stay tuned for more data protection themed episodes in the near future!

If you’re going to NetApp Insight 2017, be sure to check out these data protection themed sessions:

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

You can listen here:

XCP SMB/CIFS support available!

If you’re not familiar with what XCP is, I covered it in a previous blog post, Migrating to ONTAP – Ludicrous speed! as well as in the XCP podcast. Basically, it’s a super-fast way to scan and migrate data.

One of the downsides of the tool was the fact that it only supported NFSv3 migrations, which also meant it couldn’t handle NTFS style ACLs. Doing that would require a SMB/CIFS supported version of XCP. Today, we get that with XCP SMB/CIFS 1.0:

https://mysupport.netapp.com/tools/download/ECMLP2357425DT.html?productID=62115&pcfContentID=ECMLP2357425

XCP for SMB/CIFS supports the following:

“show” Displays information about the CIFS shares of a system
“scan”  Reads all files and directories found on a CIFS share and build assessment reports
“copy”  Recursively copies everything from source to destination
“sync”  Performs multiple incremental syncs from source to target
“verify”  Verifies that the target state matches the source, including attributes and NTFS ACLs
“activate”  Activates the XCP license on Windows hosts
“help”     Displays detailed information about XCP commands and options

 

Right now, it’s CLI only, but be on the lookout for a GUI version.

“Installing” XCP on Windows

XCP in Windows is a simple executable file that runs via the cmd or a PowerShell window. One of the pre-requisites for the software includes Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable for Visual Studio 2017. If you don’t install this, trying to run the program will result in an error that calls out a specific DLL that isn’t registered.

When I copied the file to my Windows host, I created a new directory called “C:\XCP.” You can put that directory anywhere. To run the utility in CMD, you can either navigate to the directory and run “xcp” or add the directory to your system paths to run from anywhere.

For example:

env-windows-path

XCP-path

Once that’s done, run XCP from any location:

cifs-xcp

cifs-xcp-ps.png

Licensing XCP

XCP is a licensed feature. That doesn’t mean you have to pay for it; the license is only used for tracking purposes. But you do have to apply a license. In Windows, that’s pretty easy.

  1. Download a license from xcp.netapp.com
  2. Copy the license into the C:\NetApp\XCP folder
  3. Run “xcp activate”

xcp-license.png

XCP show

The command “xcp show \\server” can give some useful information for an ONTAP SMB/CIFS server, such as:

  • Available shares
  • Capacity (used and available)
  • Current connections
  • Folder path
  • Share attributes and permissions

This output is a good way to get an overall look at what is available on a server.

cifs-xcp-show.png

XCP scan

XCP has a number of useful scanning features. These include:

PS C:\XCP> xcp help scan

usage: xcp scan [-h] [-v] [-parallel <n>] [-match <filter>] [-preserve-atime]
 [-depth <n>] [-stats] [-l] [-ownership] [-du]
 [-fmt <expression>]
 source

positional arguments:
 source

optional arguments:
 -h, --help show this help message and exit
 -v increase debug verbosity
 -parallel <n> number of concurrent processes (default: <cpu-count>)
 -match <filter> only process files and directories that match the filter
 (see `xcp help -match` for details)
 -preserve-atime restore last accessed date on source
 -depth <n> limit the search depth
 -stats print tree statistics report
 -l detailed file listing output
 -ownership retrieve ownership information
 -du summarize space usage of each directory including
 subdirectories
 -fmt <expression> format file listing according to the python expression
 (see `xcp help -fmt` for details)

I scanned my “shared” directory with the -stats option and it was able to scan over 60,000 files in 31 seconds and gave me the following stats:

== Maximum Values ==
 Size Depth Namelen Dirsize
 2.02KiB 5 15 100

== Average Values ==
 Size Depth Namelen Dirsize
 25.6 5 6 6

== Top File Extensions ==
 .py
 50003 1

== Number of files ==
 empty <8KiB 8-64KiB 64KiB-1MiB 1-10MiB 10-100MiB >100MiB
 3 50001

== Space used ==
 empty <8KiB 8-64KiB 64KiB-1MiB 1-10MiB 10-100MiB >100MiB
 0 1.22MiB 0 0 0 0 0

== Directory entries ==
 empty 1-10 10-100 100-1K 1K-10K >10k
 2 10004 101

== Depth ==
 0-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-100 >100
 60111

== Modified ==
 >1 year >1 month 1-31 days 1-24 hrs <1 hour <15 mins future
 60111

== Created ==
 >1 year >1 month 1-31 days 1-24 hrs <1 hour <15 mins future
 60111

Total count: 60111
Directories: 10107
Regular files: 50004
Symbolic links:
Junctions:
Special files:
Total space for regular files: 1.22MiB
Total space for directories: 0
Total space used: 1.22MiB
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 31s

When I increased the parallel threads to 8, it finished in 18 seconds:

PS C:\XCP> xcp scan -stats -parallel 8 \\demo\shared

Total count: 60111
Directories: 10107
Regular files: 50004
Symbolic links:
Junctions:
Special files:
Total space for regular files: 1.22MiB
Total space for directories: 0
Total space used: 1.22MiB
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 18s

XCP copy

With xcp copy, I can copy SMB/CIFS data with or without ACLs at a much faster rate than simple robocopy. Keep in mind that with this version of XCP, it doesn’t have BACKUP OPERATOR rights, so you’d need to run the utility as an admin user on both source and destination.

In the following example, I used robocopy to copy the same dataset as XCP to a NetApp FlexGroup volume.

Robocopy to FlexGroup results (~20-30 minutes)

         Total Copied Skipped Mismatch FAILED Extras
 Dirs :  10107  10106       1        0      0      0
 Files : 50004  50004       0        0      0      0
 Bytes : 1.21m  1.21m       0        0      0      0
 Times : 0:19:01 0:13:11 0:00:00 0:05:50

Speed : 1615 Bytes/sec.
 Speed : 0.092 MegaBytes/min.

UPDATE: Someone asked if the above robocopy run was done with the /MT flag, which would be a more fair apples to apples comparison, since XCP does multithreading. It wasn’t. The syntax used was:

PS C:\XCP> robocopy /S /COPYALL source destination

So, I re-ran it using MT:8 and with an empty FlexGroup after restoring the base snapshot and converting the security style to NTFS to ensure the ACLs come over as well. The multithreading of robocopy cut the time to completion roughly in half.

Robocopy /MT to FlexGroup results (~8-9 minutes)

 PS C:\XCP> robocopy /S /COPYALL /MT:8 \\demo\shared \\demo\flexgroup\robocopyMT

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ROBOCOPY :: Robust File Copy for Windows
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Started : Tue Aug 22 20:32:54 2017

Source : \\demo\shared\
 Dest : \\demo\flexgroup\robocopyMT\

Files : *.*

Options : *.* /S /COPYALL /MT:8 /R:1000000 /W:30
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total Copied Skipped Mismatch FAILED Extras
 Dirs : 10107 10106 1 0 0 0
 Files : 50004 50004 0 0 0 0
 Bytes : 1.21 m 1.21 m 0 0 0 0
 Times : 0:35:21 0:06:23 0:00:00 0:01:59

Ended : Tue Aug 22 20:41:18 2017

Then I re-ran the XCP to FlexGroup by restoring the baseline snapshot and then making sure the security style of the volume was NTFS. (It was UNIX before, which would have affected ACLs and overall speed). But, the run still held within 4 minutes. So, we’re looking at 2x as fast as robocopy with a small 60k file and folder workload. In addition, the host I’m using is a Windows 7 client VM with a 1GB network connection and not a ton of power behind it. XCP works best with more robust hardware.

win7-info

XCP to FlexGroup results – NTFS security style (~4 minutes!)

PS C:\XCP> xcp copy -parallel 8 \\demo\shared \\demo\flexgroup\XCP
1,436 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 0 copied, 0 (0/s), 5s
4,381 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 507 copied, 12.4KiB (2.48KiB/s), 10s
5,426 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 1,882 copied, 40.5KiB (5.64KiB/s), 15s
7,431 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 3,189 copied, 67.4KiB (5.37KiB/s), 20s
8,451 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 4,537 copied, 96.1KiB (5.75KiB/s), 25s
9,651 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 5,867 copied, 123KiB (5.31KiB/s), 30s
10,751 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 7,184 copied, 150KiB (5.58KiB/s), 35s
12,681 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 8,507 copied, 178KiB (5.44KiB/s), 40s
13,891 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 9,796 copied, 204KiB (5.26KiB/s), 45s
14,861 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 11,136 copied, 232KiB (5.70KiB/s), 50s
15,966 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 12,464 copied, 259KiB (5.43KiB/s), 55s
18,031 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 13,784 copied, 287KiB (5.52KiB/s), 1m0s
19,056 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 15,136 copied, 316KiB (5.80KiB/s), 1m5s
20,261 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 16,436 copied, 342KiB (5.21KiB/s), 1m10s
21,386 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 17,775 copied, 370KiB (5.65KiB/s), 1m15s
23,286 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 19,068 copied, 397KiB (5.36KiB/s), 1m20s
24,481 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 20,380 copied, 424KiB (5.44KiB/s), 1m25s
25,526 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 21,683 copied, 451KiB (5.35KiB/s), 1m30s
26,581 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 23,026 copied, 479KiB (5.62KiB/s), 1m35s
28,421 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 24,364 copied, 507KiB (5.63KiB/s), 1m40s
29,701 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 25,713 copied, 536KiB (5.70KiB/s), 1m45s
30,896 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 26,996 copied, 561KiB (5.15KiB/s), 1m50s
31,911 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 28,334 copied, 590KiB (5.63KiB/s), 1m55s
33,706 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 29,669 copied, 617KiB (5.52KiB/s), 2m0s
35,081 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 30,972 copied, 644KiB (5.44KiB/s), 2m5s
36,116 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 32,263 copied, 671KiB (5.30KiB/s), 2m10s
37,201 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 33,579 copied, 698KiB (5.48KiB/s), 2m15s
38,531 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 34,898 copied, 726KiB (5.65KiB/s), 2m20s
40,206 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 36,199 copied, 753KiB (5.36KiB/s), 2m25s
41,371 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 37,507 copied, 780KiB (5.39KiB/s), 2m30s
42,441 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 38,834 copied, 808KiB (5.63KiB/s), 2m35s
43,591 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 40,161 copied, 835KiB (5.47KiB/s), 2m40s
45,536 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 41,445 copied, 862KiB (5.31KiB/s), 2m45s
46,646 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 42,762 copied, 890KiB (5.56KiB/s), 2m50s
47,691 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 44,052 copied, 916KiB (5.30KiB/s), 2m55s
48,606 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 45,371 copied, 943KiB (5.45KiB/s), 3m0s
50,611 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 46,518 copied, 967KiB (4.84KiB/s), 3m5s
51,721 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 47,847 copied, 995KiB (5.54KiB/s), 3m10s
52,846 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 49,138 copied, 1022KiB (5.32KiB/s), 3m15s
53,876 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 50,448 copied, 1.02MiB (5.53KiB/s), 3m20s
55,871 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 51,757 copied, 1.05MiB (5.42KiB/s), 3m25s
57,011 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 53,080 copied, 1.08MiB (5.52KiB/s), 3m30s
58,101 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 54,384 copied, 1.10MiB (5.39KiB/s), 3m35s
59,156 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 55,714 copied, 1.13MiB (5.57KiB/s), 3m40s
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 57,049 copied, 1.16MiB (5.52KiB/s), 3m45s
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 58,483 copied, 1.19MiB (6.02KiB/s), 3m50s
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 59,907 copied, 1.22MiB (5.79KiB/s), 3m55s
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 60,110 copied, 1.22MiB (5.29KiB/s), 3m56s

XCP sync and verify

Sync and verify can be used during data migrations to ensure the source and target match up before cutting over. These use the same multi-processing capabilities as copy, so this should also be fast. Keep in mind that sync could also potentially be used to do incremental backups using XCP!

xcp-verify.png

New Technical Report – Electronic Design Automation (EDA) Best Practices

eda-logo

With the introduction of FlexGroup volumes in ONTAP 9.1, I mention that one of the sweet spots for FlexGroup volume use cases is the EDA space, due to the high ingest and large number of files.

As such, I’ve written up a new TR for EDA best practices that can be found here:

http://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-4617.pdf

What is EDA?

EDA stands for “Electronic Design Automation.” Essentially, it refers to software tools for designing electronic systems such as integrated circuits and printed circuit boards. The tools work together in a design flow that chip designers use to design and analyze entire semiconductor chips. Since a modern semiconductor chip can have billions of components, EDA tools are essential for their design. Here’s a list of EDA companies for reference:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_design_automation

Feel free to send feedback to the DL in the doc, or post in the comments here.

Behind the Scenes: Episode 101 – NetApp at VMworld 2017; VSC 7.0

Welcome to the Episode 101, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

group-4-2016

This week on the podcast, we bring in Dr. Desktop, Chris Gebhardt (@chrisgeb) and Virtualization TME/NetApp A-Team member Steven Cortez (@mscproductions) to talk about what’s going on at VMworld 2017 in Las Vegas, what sessions to attend and what’s new in Virtual Storage Console (VSC) 7.0.

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

You can listen here:

https://soundcloud.com/techontap_podcast/episode-101-netapp-at-vmworld-2017-vsc-70

New dedicated NFS Kerberos TR is now available!

When I first started as the NFS TME about 5 years ago, I took TR-4073 and expanded upon it to make it into a larger solution document that covered LDAP, NFSv4.x and Kerberos. As a result, it ballooned from 50-60 pages to 275 pages.

It seemed like a good idea at the time.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

What I discovered was that while people didn’t fully understand Kerberos, LDAP and NFSv4, many also just wanted something to help them set it up, rather than a manifesto on all the quirks and how it works. So, I decided to do that.

some-of-the-best-recurring-gags-in-family-guy-10-photos-10

TR-4616 is a new TR that is dedicated solely to a simplified setup of NFS Kerberos in ONTAP. The TR is a total of 43 pages, and only 10-15 pages of that is the actual set up.

To make it simpler, I did the following:

  • Limited the scope of setup to ONTAP 9.2 and later, Microsoft Windows 2012/2016, RHEL/Centos 6.x and 7.x
  • Less explanations of “what,” more on “how”
  • Fewer screenshots
  • No LDAP/NFS specific information not related to Kerberos

Have a look and let me know what you think!