Behind the Scenes – Episode 282: Core to Cloud with NetApp SnapCenter

Welcome to the Episode 282, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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This week, NetApp TMEs Mandohar Kulkarni (@kmanohar81, Manohar.Kulkarni@netapp.com) and Ebin Kadavy (@ebinvarghese001, EBIN.KADAVY@netapp.com) join us to discuss the latest SnapCenter updates, including its foray into the cloud with SnapCenter Service.

For more information:

For questions/inquiries:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 282: Core to Cloud with NetApp SnapCenter

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

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Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes – Episode 281: Veeam is Turning it Up to 11

Welcome to the Episode 281, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, Veeam’s Adam Bergh (@ajbergh) and vMiss, Melissa Palmer (@vMiss33) join us to discuss the newest Veeam 11 release and how it’s taking backup and restores to the next level.

For more information:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want an AI transcribed copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 280: Veeam is Turning it Up to 11 (Transcript)

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Or, click the “view transcript” button:

gong-transcript

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes: Episode 210 – Rubrik 101

Welcome to the Episode 210, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

This week on the podcast, we discuss the recently announced NetApp-Rubrik partnership and cover the basics of what Rubrik is and can do for NAS data protection with Rubrik PM Tony Zhou (https://www.linkedin.com/in/tony-zhou-rubrik/), Rubrik Technical Partner Manager Pierre-François Guglielmi (https://www.linkedin.com/in/pfguglielmi/) and NetApp’s Yossi Weihs (https://www.linkedin.com/n/yossiw/), Keith Norbie (@keithnorbie), and Dan Issacs (@danisaacs)!

Rubrik Logo

For more information on Rubrik, check out rubrik.com!

A couple of clarifying notes:

  • When Rubrik refers to “CDM”, this is Cloud Data Management – Rubrik’s catch all phrase for their cloud architected platform.
  • When Rubrik refers to Snapshots, they refer to their backup files as stored on their archive tier storage. So … Rubrik Snapshots are about abilities very similar to ONTAP Snapshots – retention policies, locking and immutability. Rubrik does not manage Storage snapshots for policy based retention.

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 124 – SnapCenter 4.0

Welcome to the Episode 124, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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This week on the podcast, we break down the latest and greatest features available in SnapCenter 4.0 with SnapCenter Product Manager, Anand Ranganathan (https://www.linkedin.com/in/anandrang/)!

You can also check out the official SnapCenter 4.0 blog here:

https://blog.netapp.com/snapcenter-4-0-whats-new-why-you-should-deploy-it/

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

This week’s episode is here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 86 – Veeam 9.5 Update 2

Welcome to the Episode 86, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

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We wrap up “Release Week” with an episode on Veeam’s new release with Veeam Technical Evangelist/NetApp A-Team member Michael Cade! (@michaelcade1)

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Find out what new goodness is in Veeam’s latest release and get a rundown of what Veeam actually is. For the official blog:

https://newsroom.netapp.com/blogs/tech-ontap-podcast-episode-86-veeam-9-5-update-2/

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

You can listen here:

TECH::Backing up through the years – The road to NetApp AltaVault

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Data protection has been a sore spot for IT organizations for decades, sometimes ignored or neglected until absolutely necessary. Of course, by then, it’s too late. Let’s take a look at how mankind has done their backups and archives throughout the years….

NOTE: I am not a historian and have played very fast and loose with the facts here. For a more serious take on backup history, check this site out.

First backup strategy: Cave drawings

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The early caveman would document history on the walls of caves, using various natural pigments, charcoal and torches. Naturally, this backup strategy did not have the advantage of being very agile and was susceptible to the elements. However, they have shown to be remarkably resilient, with some backups lasting 28,000 years!

Hieroglyphs

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The ancient Egyptians used a similar form of backup with hieroglyphs. The cavemen proved it could be effective. Why mess with a good thing?

Stone Tablets

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In theory, stone tablets were a significant upgrade for backups to cave walls. They were smaller and lighter, so you could move them to a safe location for better disaster recovery. But they were still pretty heavy. What if you dropped one? Or worse, what if you dropped one on your foot?

Pen and paper

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Mankind had had enough of the limitations of writing on stone walls and tablets. It was time for a new medium.

With the invention of papyrus in Egypt, people no longer had to backup to cave walls or stone tablets – neither of which were mobile or provided adequate disaster recovery. However, papyrus proved to be a fragile – and costly – backup medium.

Parchment, made from sheepskin, proved to be a more durable backup medium, but also was costly.

Eventually, wood pulp paper was invented. This made writing a cost-effective backup strategy, albeit not terribly efficient.

The printing press

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Johannes Gutenberg, likely driven by his desire to rid the world of hand cramps and need for backups in a world of ever-increasing data* (no citation needed… I made that up), invented the printing press.

The printing press made cheap, fast and easy backups of large amounts of data possible. It’s first real test? 180 copies of the Gutenberg Bible.

Over the years, the printing press evolved into a much larger entity, running thousands of copies of newspapers a day and archiving the world’s most historic events accurately and efficiently.

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The photo copier

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With the growing need for enterprises to back up important files on-site, Chester Carlson set out to try to develop his idea for electrophotographic copies of paper. He was turned down by over 20 companies, including IBM and GE. In 1944, 5 years after he started, a nonprofit called Battelle Memorial Institute finally listened. In 1947, a company called Haloid helped Carlson refine the process and renamed it “xerography.” In 1949, the first Xerox copier was introduced.

Now, the enterprise IT admin could make copies of anything – important files, signatures, buttocks. The sky was the limit.

But while paper was relatively inexpensive, it was also not durable. Plus, a new challenge was surfacing – how to back up the digital data stored on computers.

Punch cards

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The first computers,(such as ENIAC, UNIVAC), were monolithic devices that took up entire rooms and were operated by a series of punch cards. These cards contained computer programs that could store data on a larger scale than normal pen and paper. However, by modern data standards, they didn’t hold much. This Gizmodo article postulates how many punch cards you’d need to store 15 exabytes of data. The answer?

Let’s assume Google has a storage capacity of 15 exabytes, or 15,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes. A punch card can hold about 80 characters, and a box of cards holds 2000 cards. 15 exabytes of punch cards would be enough to cover my home region, New England, to a depth of about 4.5 kilometers. That’s three times deeper than the ice sheets that covered the region during the last advance of the glaciers.

Yikes.

Magnetic tape

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With magnetic tape, we’re now entering the realm that most modern IT admins are familiar with. However, did you know that tape has existed for over 200 years in various fields? And that they actually were around when punch cards were used, but were so terrible, punch cards were preferred?

Over the years, that’s changed. Tape quality, capacity and performance has increased magnitudes to where we can feel safe storing our enterprise data on them…. and then trucking them off somewhere else. That was problematic in and of itself – not only did you have to back things up to tape, you had to pay a company to cart them off to a secure location – and trust your data with a 3rd party. And if you grew up during the time of mixed tapes, you remember wearing them out until they were unlistenable. (Or at least recall accidentally pulling the tape out and having to re-wind it with a pencil.

So, with tape, capacity and mobility was there, but durability and speed were still not bringing ease to companies that needed to keep data around a while.

Backup to disk

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As hard drive costs came down over the years, it became more and more viable to back data up to disk. Then, with RAID, it became more of a reality – we could now reliably survive hardware failures. Plus, disks were mobile! We could back up, pull the disks out and store them elsewhere for safekeeping. And with the sheer physics of spinning disk, keeping disks powered off theoretically would help them last longer than if they were running, though there is no definitive study to prove or disprove that theory that I could find. Don’t tell that to SSDs, though

Storage operating systems, like NetApp’s Data ONTAP, also provide backup to disk capability via snapshot, as well as backup over a WAN using SnapMirror. I cover this in my Snapshots & Polaroid blog on DataCenterDude.

The cloud

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Today’s push for backup is now towards the cloud. Disks, while cheaper than ever, still cost money. And if you’re going to back up over the WAN, why not do it to a cloud provider with dirt cheap storage that only gets cheaper the less often you access your data?

Sure, you don’t own the disk, but you also don’t own the SLAs or maintenance – someone else does. Someone else has to hire the storage admins to manage the backups and archives you only use when you need them.

Sure, you worry about security – who doesn’t – but how is it any less secure than hiring a company to truck off your tapes to another facility? People did that for years with no concern. You could argue that backing up to the cloud might even be MORE secure than the old ways. Definitely more secure than cave drawings…

Enter Alta Vault!

This is where NetApp’s AltaVault (borne out of Riverbed Steelstore) comes in. Rachel Dines gives an excellent run down of this cloud-based backup solution in her blog on the NetApp communities.

Introducing AltaVault: The Solution to Your Backup & Restore Challenges

Additionally, NetApp A-Team member Jarett Kulm gives a run down from a non-NetApp perspective in his blog.

Netapp AltaVault – Speeding up, Cutting costs, and Cloudify your backups

Backups and restores are forever evolving and NetApp AltaVault is helping you get to the next step.

TECH::Using PowerShell to back up and restore CIFS shares/NFS exports in NetApp’s clustered Data ONTAP

NOTE: This post covers DR for NAS objects prior to 8.3.1. After 8.3.1, use the new SVM DR functionality if possible.

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NetApp’s Data ONTAP operating in 7-mode kept all relevant configuration files in its root volume under /etc. These files get read at boot and are used to set up the filer. This included stuff like DNS configuration (resolv.conf), name service switches (nsswitch.conf), initial config (rc file), hosts and other various configuration files.

Another file that is stored in /etc in 7-mode is the file that builds the filer’s CIFS shares each time it is booted – cifsconfig_share.cfg.

This file is essentially a list of CIFS share and access commands that gets sourced each time the system boots. This is what one of those files looks like in 7-mode:

#Generated automatically by cifs commands
cifs shares -add "ETC$" "/etc" -comment "Remote Administration"
cifs access "ETC$" S-1-5-32-544 Full Control
cifs shares -add "HOME" "/vol/vol0/home" -comment "Default Share"
cifs access "HOME" S-NONE "nosd"
cifs shares -add "C$" "/" -comment "Remote Administration"
cifs access "C$" S-1-5-32-544 Full Control
cifs shares -add "CIFS" "/vol/cifs" -comment "CIFS"
cifs access "CIFS" S-NONE "nosd"
cifs shares -add "mixed" "/vol/mixed" -comment ""
cifs access "mixed" S-NONE "nosd"

7mode> cifs shares
Name Mount Point      Description
---- -----------      -----------
ETC$ /etc             Remote Administration
                 BUILTIN\Administrators / Full Control
HOME /vol/vol0/home   Default Share
                 everyone / Full Control
C$ /                  Remote Administration
                 BUILTIN\Administrators / Full Control
CIFS /vol/cifs        CIFS
                 everyone / Full Control
mixed /vol/mixed
                 everyone / Full Control

One benefit of this file in 7-mode was the ability to copy this file off somewhere to back up and possibly restore the shares at a later date, or even retrieve the file from snapshot.

However, with the newer clustered Data ONTAP, the concept of flat files is gone. Everything gets stored in a replicated database, which helps the cluster act like a cluster. I cover that in some detail in a previous post on DataCenterDude.com, NetApp cDOT, RDB, & Epsilon.

Additionally, in clustered Data ONTAP, if a CIFS server gets deleted (such as when removing it from the domain/re-adding it), the CIFS shares get blown away and would need to get re-created one by one.

So what do the people who relied on the old 7-mode CIFS share files do?

Script it out, of course! For more information, including where to find pre-written scripts, see the post on DataCenterDude.com!

Requires powershell module for Data ONTAP, which can be found here: http://mysupport.netapp.com/NOW/download/tools/powershell_toolkit/download.shtml

UPDATE #1:

Recently, a consultant named Scott Harney was inspired by the CIFS share script and not only made some improvements to it, but also created one for NFS exports and rules!

Check it out at his blog:

http://scottharney.com/powershell-scripts-for-backup-of-cdot-nfs-exports/

http://www.datacenterdude.com/storage/backup-restore-cifs-shares-netapp-clustered-data-ontap-powershell/

UPDATE #2 (7/6/15):

Tested the scripts with both 8.2.4 and 8.3.1. Had to work out a few kinks/make some improvements. There is an issue in 8.3.1 with Add-NcCifsShare.

The following changes were made:

  • Tested with 8.2.4 and 8.3.1 cDOT releases
  • Change Import-Module to generic “DataONTAP” to avoid path issues
  • Added link to DataONTAP PS module download in comments
  • Changed PS commands to replace “-Name” with “-Share”
  • Changed output file of ACLs to $aclFile (was $shareFile)

These changes are up on the github repository now. Feel free to notify me if anything else is broken or needs improvement!

https://github.com/DatacenterDudes/cDOT-CIFS-share-backup-restore

If you’re looking for a way to backup Snapmirror schedules, see this link: http://mysupport.netapp.com/NOW/download/tools/smtk/

TECH::NFSDudeAbides and DataCenterDude team up!

If you’ve ever been to datacenterdude.com, run by the @datacenterdude himself (Nick Howell), then you’ll know it’s chock full of tech goodness for virt and storage nerds. I recently had the opportunity to volunteer my services to his efforts and now am officially a part of the datacenterdude.com team!

My first contribution was about snapshots and backups called Snapshots & Polaroids: Neither Lasts Forever. Check it out!

I’ll still be manning this blog as well. I’ll just be pulling double duty!

It’s not just me, though. There are a number of other rock solid tech experts. Meet the tech super-friends at http://datacenterdude.com/about/!

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