NetApp FlexGroup: Crazy fast

This week, the SPEC SFS®2014_swbuild test results for NetApp FlexGroup volumes submitted for file services were approved and published.

TL;DR – NetApp was the cream of the crop.

You can find those results here:

http://spec.org/sfs2014/results/res2017q3/sfs2014-20170908-00021.html

The testing rig was as follows:

  • Four node FAS8200 cluster (not AFF)
  • 72 4TB 7200 RPM 12Gb SAS drives (per HA pair)
  • NFSv3
  • 20 IBM servers/clients
  • 10GbE network (four connections per HA pair)

Below is a graph that consolidates the results of multiple vendor SPEC SFS®2014_swbuild results. Notice the FlexGroup did more IOPS (around 260k) at a lower latency (sub 3ms):

specsfs-fg

In addition, NetApp had the best Overall Response Time (ORT) of the competition:

specsfs-ort

And had the best MBps/throughput:

specsfs-mbps

Full results here:

http://spec.org/sfs2014/results/sfs2014swbuild.html

For more information on the SPEC SFS®2014_swbuild test, see https://www.spec.org/sfs2014/.

Everything but the kitchen sink…

With a NetApp FlexGroup, the more clients and work you throw at it, the better it will perform. An example of this is seen in TR-4571, with a 2 node A700 doing GIT workload testing. Note how increasing the jobs only encourages the FlexGroup.

average-iops

max-mbps-git

FlexGroup Resources

If you’re interested in learning more, see the following resources:

You can also email us at flexgroups-info@netapp.com.

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Tech ONTAP Podcast: Now powered by NetApp FlexGroup volumes!

If you’re not aware, I co-host the Tech ONTAP Podcast. I also am the TME for NetApp FlexGroup volumes. Inexplicably, we weren’t actually storing our podcast files on NetApp storage – instead, we were using the local Mac SSD, which was problematic for three reasons:

  1. It was eventually going to fill up.
  2. If it failed, bye bye files.
  3. It was close to impossible to access unless were were local to the Mac, for a variety of reasons.

So, it finally dawned on me that I had an AFF8040 in my lab, barely being used for anything except testing and TR writing.

At first, I was going to use a FlexVol, out of habit. But then I realized that a FlexGroup volume would provide a great place to write a bunch of 1-400MB files while leveraging all of my cluster resources. The whole process, from creating the FlexGroup, googling autofs in Mac and setting up the NFS mount and Audio Hijack, took me all of maybe 30 minutes (most of that googling and setting up autofs). Not bad!

The podcast setup

When we record the podcast, we use software called Audio Hijack. This allows us to pipe in sound from applications like WebEx and web browsers, as well as from the in-studio microphones, which all get converted to MP3. This is where the FlexGroup NFS mount comes in – we’ll be pointing Audio Hijack to the FlexGroup volume, where the MP3 files will stream in real time.

Additionally, I also migrated all the existing data over to the FlexGroup for archival purposes. We do use OneDrive to do podcast sharing and such, but I wanted an extra layer of centralized data access, and the NFS mounted FlexGroup provides that. Setting it up to stream right from Audio Hijack removes an extra step for me when processing the files. But, before I could point the software at the NFS mount, I had to configure the Mac to automount the FlexGroup volume on boot.

Creating the FlexGroup volume

Normally, a FlexGroup volume is created with 8 member volumes per node for an AFF (as per best practice). However, my FlexGroup volume was going to be around 5TB. That means 16 member volumes would be around 350-400GB each. That violates the other best practices of no less than 500GB per member, to avoid too much remote allocation. While my file sizes weren’t going to be huge, I wanted to avoid issues as the volume filled, so I met in the middle – 8 member volumes total, 4 per node. To do that, you have to go to the CLI; System Manager doesn’t do customization like that yet. In particular, you need the -aggr-list and -aggr-list-multiplier options with volume create.

ontap9-tme-8040::*> vol create -vserver DEMO -volume TechONTAP -aggr-list aggr1_node1,aggr1_node2 -aggr-list-multiplier 4
ontap9-tme-8040::*> vol show -vserver DEMO -volume TechONTAP* -sort-by size -fields size,node
vserver volume size node
------- --------------- ----- ------------------
DEMO TechONTAP__0001 640GB ontap9-tme-8040-01
DEMO TechONTAP__0002 640GB ontap9-tme-8040-02
DEMO TechONTAP__0003 640GB ontap9-tme-8040-01
DEMO TechONTAP__0004 640GB ontap9-tme-8040-02
DEMO TechONTAP__0005 640GB ontap9-tme-8040-01
DEMO TechONTAP__0006 640GB ontap9-tme-8040-02
DEMO TechONTAP__0007 640GB ontap9-tme-8040-01
DEMO TechONTAP__0008 640GB ontap9-tme-8040-02
DEMO TechONTAP 5TB -

Automounting NFS on boot with a Mac

When you mount NFS with a Mac, it doesn’t retain it after you reboot. To get the mount to come back up, you have to configure the autofs service on the Mac. This is different from Linux, where you can simply edit the fstab file. The process is covered very well in this blog post (just be sure to read all the way down to avoid the issue he mentions at the end):

https://coderwall.com/p/fuoa-g/automounting-nfs-share-in-os-x-into-volumes

Here’s my configuration…. I disabled “nobrowse” to prevent issues in case Audio Hijack needed to be able to browse.

autofs.conf

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 10.04.37 AM

auto_master file

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 10.04.59 AM

auto_nfs

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 10.05.17 AM

After that was set up, I copied over the existing 50-ish GBs of data into the FlexGroup and cleaned up some space on the Mac.

ontap9-tme-8040::*> vol show -vserver DEMO -volume TechONTAP* -sort-by size -fields size,used
vserver volume size used
------- --------------- ----- -------
DEMO TechONTAP__0001 640GB 5.69GB
DEMO TechONTAP__0002 640GB 8.24GB
DEMO TechONTAP__0003 640GB 5.56GB
DEMO TechONTAP__0004 640GB 6.48GB
DEMO TechONTAP__0005 640GB 6.42GB
DEMO TechONTAP__0006 640GB 8.39GB
DEMO TechONTAP__0007 640GB 6.25GB
DEMO TechONTAP__0008 640GB 6.25GB
DEMO TechONTAP 5TB 53.29GB
9 entries were displayed.

Then, I configured Audio Hijack to pump the recordings to the FlexGroup volume.

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 10.01.00 AM.png

Then, we recorded a couple episodes, without an issue!

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 10.34.30 AM.png

As you can see from this output, the FlexGroup volume is relatively evenly allocated:

ontap9-tme-8040::*> node run * flexgroup show TechONTAP
2 entries were acted on.

Node: ontap9-tme-8040-01
FlexGroup 0x80F03817
* next snapshot cleanup due in 2886 msec
* next refresh message due in 886 msec (last to member 0x80F0381F)
* spinnp version negotiated as 4.6, capability 0x3
* Ref count is 8

Idx Member L Used Avail Urgc Targ Probabilities D-Ingest Alloc F-Ingest Alloc
--- -------- - --------------- ---------- ---- ---- --------------------- --------- ----- --------- -----
 1 2044 L 1485146 0% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 79% 79%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 2 2045 R 2153941 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 98% 98%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 3 2046 L 1415120 0% 159339950 0% 12% [100% 100% 76% 76%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 4 2047 R 1690392 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 98% 98%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 5 2048 L 1675583 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 98% 98%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 6 2049 R 2191360 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 98% 98%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 7 2050 L 1630946 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 87% 87%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 8 2051 R 1631429 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 87% 87%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0

Node: ontap9-tme-8040-02
FlexGroup 0x80F03817
* next snapshot cleanup due in 3144 msec
* next refresh message due in 144 msec (last to member 0x80F03818)
* spinnp version negotiated as 4.6, capability 0x3
* Ref count is 8

Idx Member L Used Avail Urgc Targ Probabilities D-Ingest Alloc F-Ingest Alloc
--- -------- - --------------- ---------- ---- ---- --------------------- --------- ----- --------- -----
 1 2044 R 1485146 0% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 79% 79%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 2 2045 L 2153941 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 98% 98%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 3 2046 R 1415120 0% 159339950 0% 12% [100% 100% 76% 76%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 4 2047 L 1690392 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 98% 98%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 5 2048 R 1675583 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 98% 98%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 6 2049 L 2191360 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 98% 98%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 7 2050 R 1630946 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 87% 87%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0
 8 2051 L 1631429 1% 159376256 0% 12% [100% 100% 87% 87%] 0+ 0 0 0+ 0 0

I plan on using this setup when I start writing the new FlexGroup data protection best practice guide, so stay tuned for that…

So, now, the Tech ONTAP podcast is happily drinking the NetApp FlexGroup champagne!

If you’re going to NetApp Insight, check out session 16594-2 on FlexGroup volumes.

For more information on NetApp FlexGroup volumes, see:

New! NetApp FlexGroup Lab on Demand

Working in the laboratory

Interested in trying out NetApp FlexGroup volumes yourself? Well, we have a new Lab on Demand available that guides you through the setup and configuration of NetApp FlexGroup volumes, as well as managing and monitoring the feature.

If you have a NetApp login and are a partner or internal employee, you can check it out here:

https://labondemand.netapp.com/catalog (log in and then search for/click on the NetApp FlexGroup Volumes in ONTAP v1.0 lab)

If you’re a customer, ping your account team for access, or check out the Lab on Demand at Insight!

While you’re there, be sure to check out other Labs on Demand!

What is Lab on Demand?

Lab on Demand is a fully automated virtualized sandbox of a multitude of NetApp technologies. You can do pretty much anything in these labs, including:

  • Setting up SnapMirror and SnapVault relationships
  • Managing Multiprotocol NAS environments using LDAP
  • Configuring and using SnapCenter
  • Using Docker and Kubernetes with NetApp
  • Testing VMware SRM Backup and Recover

And much more!

Be sure to send lab feedback to flexgroups-info@netapp.com or post to the comments here!

XCP SMB/CIFS support available!

If you’re not familiar with what XCP is, I covered it in a previous blog post, Migrating to ONTAP – Ludicrous speed! as well as in the XCP podcast. Basically, it’s a super-fast way to scan and migrate data.

One of the downsides of the tool was the fact that it only supported NFSv3 migrations, which also meant it couldn’t handle NTFS style ACLs. Doing that would require a SMB/CIFS supported version of XCP. Today, we get that with XCP SMB/CIFS 1.0:

https://mysupport.netapp.com/tools/download/ECMLP2357425DT.html?productID=62115&pcfContentID=ECMLP2357425

XCP for SMB/CIFS supports the following:

“show” Displays information about the CIFS shares of a system
“scan”  Reads all files and directories found on a CIFS share and build assessment reports
“copy”  Recursively copies everything from source to destination
“sync”  Performs multiple incremental syncs from source to target
“verify”  Verifies that the target state matches the source, including attributes and NTFS ACLs
“activate”  Activates the XCP license on Windows hosts
“help”     Displays detailed information about XCP commands and options

 

Right now, it’s CLI only, but be on the lookout for a GUI version.

“Installing” XCP on Windows

XCP in Windows is a simple executable file that runs via the cmd or a PowerShell window. One of the pre-requisites for the software includes Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable for Visual Studio 2017. If you don’t install this, trying to run the program will result in an error that calls out a specific DLL that isn’t registered.

When I copied the file to my Windows host, I created a new directory called “C:\XCP.” You can put that directory anywhere. To run the utility in CMD, you can either navigate to the directory and run “xcp” or add the directory to your system paths to run from anywhere.

For example:

env-windows-path

XCP-path

Once that’s done, run XCP from any location:

cifs-xcp

cifs-xcp-ps.png

Licensing XCP

XCP is a licensed feature. That doesn’t mean you have to pay for it; the license is only used for tracking purposes. But you do have to apply a license. In Windows, that’s pretty easy.

  1. Download a license from xcp.netapp.com
  2. Copy the license into the C:\NetApp\XCP folder
  3. Run “xcp activate”

xcp-license.png

XCP show

The command “xcp show \\server” can give some useful information for an ONTAP SMB/CIFS server, such as:

  • Available shares
  • Capacity (used and available)
  • Current connections
  • Folder path
  • Share attributes and permissions

This output is a good way to get an overall look at what is available on a server.

cifs-xcp-show.png

XCP scan

XCP has a number of useful scanning features. These include:

PS C:\XCP> xcp help scan

usage: xcp scan [-h] [-v] [-parallel <n>] [-match <filter>] [-preserve-atime]
 [-depth <n>] [-stats] [-l] [-ownership] [-du]
 [-fmt <expression>]
 source

positional arguments:
 source

optional arguments:
 -h, --help show this help message and exit
 -v increase debug verbosity
 -parallel <n> number of concurrent processes (default: <cpu-count>)
 -match <filter> only process files and directories that match the filter
 (see `xcp help -match` for details)
 -preserve-atime restore last accessed date on source
 -depth <n> limit the search depth
 -stats print tree statistics report
 -l detailed file listing output
 -ownership retrieve ownership information
 -du summarize space usage of each directory including
 subdirectories
 -fmt <expression> format file listing according to the python expression
 (see `xcp help -fmt` for details)

I scanned my “shared” directory with the -stats option and it was able to scan over 60,000 files in 31 seconds and gave me the following stats:

== Maximum Values ==
 Size Depth Namelen Dirsize
 2.02KiB 5 15 100

== Average Values ==
 Size Depth Namelen Dirsize
 25.6 5 6 6

== Top File Extensions ==
 .py
 50003 1

== Number of files ==
 empty <8KiB 8-64KiB 64KiB-1MiB 1-10MiB 10-100MiB >100MiB
 3 50001

== Space used ==
 empty <8KiB 8-64KiB 64KiB-1MiB 1-10MiB 10-100MiB >100MiB
 0 1.22MiB 0 0 0 0 0

== Directory entries ==
 empty 1-10 10-100 100-1K 1K-10K >10k
 2 10004 101

== Depth ==
 0-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-100 >100
 60111

== Modified ==
 >1 year >1 month 1-31 days 1-24 hrs <1 hour <15 mins future
 60111

== Created ==
 >1 year >1 month 1-31 days 1-24 hrs <1 hour <15 mins future
 60111

Total count: 60111
Directories: 10107
Regular files: 50004
Symbolic links:
Junctions:
Special files:
Total space for regular files: 1.22MiB
Total space for directories: 0
Total space used: 1.22MiB
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 31s

When I increased the parallel threads to 8, it finished in 18 seconds:

PS C:\XCP> xcp scan -stats -parallel 8 \\demo\shared

Total count: 60111
Directories: 10107
Regular files: 50004
Symbolic links:
Junctions:
Special files:
Total space for regular files: 1.22MiB
Total space for directories: 0
Total space used: 1.22MiB
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 18s

XCP copy

With xcp copy, I can copy SMB/CIFS data with or without ACLs at a much faster rate than simple robocopy. Keep in mind that with this version of XCP, it doesn’t have BACKUP OPERATOR rights, so you’d need to run the utility as an admin user on both source and destination.

In the following example, I used robocopy to copy the same dataset as XCP to a NetApp FlexGroup volume.

Robocopy to FlexGroup results (~20-30 minutes)

         Total Copied Skipped Mismatch FAILED Extras
 Dirs :  10107  10106       1        0      0      0
 Files : 50004  50004       0        0      0      0
 Bytes : 1.21m  1.21m       0        0      0      0
 Times : 0:19:01 0:13:11 0:00:00 0:05:50

Speed : 1615 Bytes/sec.
 Speed : 0.092 MegaBytes/min.

UPDATE: Someone asked if the above robocopy run was done with the /MT flag, which would be a more fair apples to apples comparison, since XCP does multithreading. It wasn’t. The syntax used was:

PS C:\XCP> robocopy /S /COPYALL source destination

So, I re-ran it using MT:8 and with an empty FlexGroup after restoring the base snapshot and converting the security style to NTFS to ensure the ACLs come over as well. The multithreading of robocopy cut the time to completion roughly in half.

Robocopy /MT to FlexGroup results (~8-9 minutes)

 PS C:\XCP> robocopy /S /COPYALL /MT:8 \\demo\shared \\demo\flexgroup\robocopyMT

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ROBOCOPY :: Robust File Copy for Windows
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Started : Tue Aug 22 20:32:54 2017

Source : \\demo\shared\
 Dest : \\demo\flexgroup\robocopyMT\

Files : *.*

Options : *.* /S /COPYALL /MT:8 /R:1000000 /W:30
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total Copied Skipped Mismatch FAILED Extras
 Dirs : 10107 10106 1 0 0 0
 Files : 50004 50004 0 0 0 0
 Bytes : 1.21 m 1.21 m 0 0 0 0
 Times : 0:35:21 0:06:23 0:00:00 0:01:59

Ended : Tue Aug 22 20:41:18 2017

Then I re-ran the XCP to FlexGroup by restoring the baseline snapshot and then making sure the security style of the volume was NTFS. (It was UNIX before, which would have affected ACLs and overall speed). But, the run still held within 4 minutes. So, we’re looking at 2x as fast as robocopy with a small 60k file and folder workload. In addition, the host I’m using is a Windows 7 client VM with a 1GB network connection and not a ton of power behind it. XCP works best with more robust hardware.

win7-info

XCP to FlexGroup results – NTFS security style (~4 minutes!)

PS C:\XCP> xcp copy -parallel 8 \\demo\shared \\demo\flexgroup\XCP
1,436 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 0 copied, 0 (0/s), 5s
4,381 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 507 copied, 12.4KiB (2.48KiB/s), 10s
5,426 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 1,882 copied, 40.5KiB (5.64KiB/s), 15s
7,431 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 3,189 copied, 67.4KiB (5.37KiB/s), 20s
8,451 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 4,537 copied, 96.1KiB (5.75KiB/s), 25s
9,651 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 5,867 copied, 123KiB (5.31KiB/s), 30s
10,751 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 7,184 copied, 150KiB (5.58KiB/s), 35s
12,681 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 8,507 copied, 178KiB (5.44KiB/s), 40s
13,891 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 9,796 copied, 204KiB (5.26KiB/s), 45s
14,861 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 11,136 copied, 232KiB (5.70KiB/s), 50s
15,966 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 12,464 copied, 259KiB (5.43KiB/s), 55s
18,031 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 13,784 copied, 287KiB (5.52KiB/s), 1m0s
19,056 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 15,136 copied, 316KiB (5.80KiB/s), 1m5s
20,261 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 16,436 copied, 342KiB (5.21KiB/s), 1m10s
21,386 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 17,775 copied, 370KiB (5.65KiB/s), 1m15s
23,286 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 19,068 copied, 397KiB (5.36KiB/s), 1m20s
24,481 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 20,380 copied, 424KiB (5.44KiB/s), 1m25s
25,526 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 21,683 copied, 451KiB (5.35KiB/s), 1m30s
26,581 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 23,026 copied, 479KiB (5.62KiB/s), 1m35s
28,421 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 24,364 copied, 507KiB (5.63KiB/s), 1m40s
29,701 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 25,713 copied, 536KiB (5.70KiB/s), 1m45s
30,896 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 26,996 copied, 561KiB (5.15KiB/s), 1m50s
31,911 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 28,334 copied, 590KiB (5.63KiB/s), 1m55s
33,706 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 29,669 copied, 617KiB (5.52KiB/s), 2m0s
35,081 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 30,972 copied, 644KiB (5.44KiB/s), 2m5s
36,116 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 32,263 copied, 671KiB (5.30KiB/s), 2m10s
37,201 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 33,579 copied, 698KiB (5.48KiB/s), 2m15s
38,531 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 34,898 copied, 726KiB (5.65KiB/s), 2m20s
40,206 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 36,199 copied, 753KiB (5.36KiB/s), 2m25s
41,371 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 37,507 copied, 780KiB (5.39KiB/s), 2m30s
42,441 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 38,834 copied, 808KiB (5.63KiB/s), 2m35s
43,591 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 40,161 copied, 835KiB (5.47KiB/s), 2m40s
45,536 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 41,445 copied, 862KiB (5.31KiB/s), 2m45s
46,646 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 42,762 copied, 890KiB (5.56KiB/s), 2m50s
47,691 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 44,052 copied, 916KiB (5.30KiB/s), 2m55s
48,606 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 45,371 copied, 943KiB (5.45KiB/s), 3m0s
50,611 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 46,518 copied, 967KiB (4.84KiB/s), 3m5s
51,721 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 47,847 copied, 995KiB (5.54KiB/s), 3m10s
52,846 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 49,138 copied, 1022KiB (5.32KiB/s), 3m15s
53,876 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 50,448 copied, 1.02MiB (5.53KiB/s), 3m20s
55,871 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 51,757 copied, 1.05MiB (5.42KiB/s), 3m25s
57,011 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 53,080 copied, 1.08MiB (5.52KiB/s), 3m30s
58,101 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 54,384 copied, 1.10MiB (5.39KiB/s), 3m35s
59,156 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 55,714 copied, 1.13MiB (5.57KiB/s), 3m40s
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 57,049 copied, 1.16MiB (5.52KiB/s), 3m45s
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 58,483 copied, 1.19MiB (6.02KiB/s), 3m50s
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 59,907 copied, 1.22MiB (5.79KiB/s), 3m55s
60,111 scanned, 0 errors, 0 skipped, 60,110 copied, 1.22MiB (5.29KiB/s), 3m56s

XCP sync and verify

Sync and verify can be used during data migrations to ensure the source and target match up before cutting over. These use the same multi-processing capabilities as copy, so this should also be fast. Keep in mind that sync could also potentially be used to do incremental backups using XCP!

xcp-verify.png

New Technical Report – Electronic Design Automation (EDA) Best Practices

eda-logo

With the introduction of FlexGroup volumes in ONTAP 9.1, I mention that one of the sweet spots for FlexGroup volume use cases is the EDA space, due to the high ingest and large number of files.

As such, I’ve written up a new TR for EDA best practices that can be found here:

http://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-4617.pdf

What is EDA?

EDA stands for “Electronic Design Automation.” Essentially, it refers to software tools for designing electronic systems such as integrated circuits and printed circuit boards. The tools work together in a design flow that chip designers use to design and analyze entire semiconductor chips. Since a modern semiconductor chip can have billions of components, EDA tools are essential for their design. Here’s a list of EDA companies for reference:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_design_automation

Feel free to send feedback to the DL in the doc, or post in the comments here.

Behind the Scenes: Episode 88 – Migrating to ONTAP, FlexGroup volumes

Welcome to the Episode 88, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

group-4-2016

This week on the podcast, we invited Hadrian Baron of NetApp’s migration team to talk about moving from 7-Mode and competitor storage over to clustered ONTAP, as well as the advancements made in the simplicity and speed of moving there. We also discuss multiprotocol NAS challenges and FlexGroup volumes and their benefits.

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

You can listen here:

You can also now find us on YouTube. (The uploads are sporadic and we don’t go back prior to Episode 85):

ONTAP 9.2RC1 is available!

Like clockwork, the 6 month cadence is upon us again.

clockwork_930w_spc-31

ONTAP 9.2RC1 is available for download here:

http://mysupport.netapp.com/NOW/download/software/ontap/9.2RC1/

If you’re interested in a podcast where we cover the ONTAP 9.2 features, check it out here:

Also out: OnCommand (truly) Unified Manager 7.2:

http://mysupport.netapp.com/documentation/productlibrary/index.html?productID=61373

For now, let’s dive in a bit, shall we?

First of all, I made sure to upgrade my own cluster to show some of the new stuff off. Went off without a hitch:

upgraded

Now, let’s start with one of the most eagerly awaited new features…

Aggregate Inline Deduplication

If you’re not familiar with deduplication, it’s a storage feature that allows blocks that are identical to rely on pointers to a single block instead of having multiple copies of the same blocks. For example, if I am storing multiple JPEG images on a share (or even inside the same PowerPoint file), deduplication will allow me to save storage space by storing just one copy of the data. The image below is an 8.4MB photo I took in Point Reyes, California:

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If I store two copies of the file on a share (no deduplication), that means I use up 16MB.

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If I use deduplication, then that means the duplicate blocks only take up 4KB per block as they are pointed back to a single copy of the blocks.

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If I have multiple copies of the same image, they all point back to the same blocks:

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Pretty cool, eh?

Well, there was *one* problem with how ONTAP does deduplication; the duplicate blocks only count against a single FlexVol volume. That meant if we had the same file in multiple volumes, you don’t get the benefits of deduplication across those volumes.

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In ONTAP 9.2, that issue is resolved. You can now take advantage of deduplication when multiple volumes reside in the same physical aggregate.

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This is all currently done inline (as data is ingested) only, and currently only on All Flash FAS systems. The space savings come in handy in workloads such as ESXi datastores, where you may be applying OS patches across multiple VMs in multiple datastores hosted in multiple FlexVol volumes.

At a high level, this animation shows how it works:

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Another place where aggregate inline deduplication would rock? NetApp FlexGroup volumes, where a single container is comprised of multiple member FlexVols on the same physical storage. Speaking of FlexGroup volumes, that leads us to the next feature added to ONTAP 9.2.

Other storage efficiency improvements

In addition to aggregate inline dedupe, ONTAP 9.2 also adds:

  • Advanced Drive Partitioning v2 (ADPv2) support for FAS8xxx and FAS9xxx with spinning drives; previously ADPv2 was only supported on All Flash FAS
  • Increase of the maximum aggregate size to 800TB (was previously 400TB)
  • Automated aggregate provisioning in System Manager for easier aggregate creation

NetApp Volume Encryption on FlexGroup volumes

ONTAP 9.1 introduced volume-level encryption (NVE). We did a podcast on it if you’re interested in learning more about it, but in ONTAP 9.2, support for NVE was added to NetApp FlexGroup volumes. Now you can apply encryption only at the volume level (as opposed to the disks via NSE drives) for your large, unstructured NAS workloads.

To apply it, all you need is a volume encryption license. Then, use the same process you would use for a FlexVol volume.

Additionally, NVE can now be used on SnapLock compliance volumes!

Quality of Service (QoS) Minimums/Guaranteed QoS

In ONTAP 8.2, NetApp introduced Quality of Service to allow storage administrators to apply policies to volumes – and even files like luns or VMs – to prevent bully workloads from affecting other workloads in a cluster.

Last year, NetApp acquired SolidFire, which has a pretty mean QoS of its own where it actually approaches QoS from the other end of the spectrum – guaranteeing a performance floor for workloads that require a specific service level.

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I’m not 100% sure, but I’m guessing NetApp saw that and said “that’s pretty sweet. Let’s do that.”

So, they have. Now, ONTAP 9.2 has a maximum and a minimum/guaranteed QoS for storage administrators and service providers. Check out a video on it here:

ONTAP Select enhancements

ONTAP 9.2 also includes some ONTAP Select enhancements, such as:

  • 2-node HA support
  • FlexGroup volume support
  • Improved performance
  • Easier deployment
  • ESX Robo license
  • Single node ONTAP Select vNAS with VSAN and iSCSI LUN support
  • Inline deduplication support

Usability enhancements

ONTAP is also continuing its mission to make the deployment and configuration via the System Manager GUI easier and easier. In ONTAP 9.2, we bring:

  • Enhanced upgrade support
  • Application aware data management
  • Simplified cluster expansion
  • Simplified aggregate deployment
  • Guided cluster setup

FabricPools

We covered FabricPools in Episode 63 of the Tech ONTAP podcast. Essentially, FabricPools tier cold blocks from flash disk to cloud or an on-premises S3 target like StorageGRID WebScale. It’s not a replacement for backup or disaster recovery; it’s more of a way to lower your total cost of ownership for storage by moving data that is not actively in use to free up space for other workloads. This is all done automatically via a policy. It behaves more like an extension of the aggregate, as the pointers to the blocks that moved remain on the local storage device.

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ONTAP 9.2 introduces version 1 of this feature, which will support the following:

  • Tiering to S3 (StorageGRID) or AWS
  • Snapshot-only tiering on primary storage
  • SnapMirror destination tiering on secondary storage

Future releases will add more functionality, so stay tuned for that! We’ll also be featuring FabricPools in a deep dive for a future podcast episode.

So there you have it! The latest release of ONTAP! Post your thoughts or questions in the comments below!

New doc – Top Best Practices for FlexGroup volumes

When I wrote TR-4571: NetApp FlexGroup Volume Best Practices and Implementation Guide, I wanted to keep the document under 50 pages to be more manageable and digestible. 95 pages later, I realized there was so much good information to pass on to people about NetApp FlexGroup volumes that I wasn’t going to be able to condense a TR down effectively.

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The TRs have been out for a while now, and I’m seeing that 95 pages might be a bit much for some people. Everyone’s busy! I was getting asked the same general questions about deploying FlexGroup volumes over and over and decided I needed to create a new, shorter best practices document that focused *only* on the most important, most frequently asked general best practices. It’s part TR, part FAQ. It’s more of an addendum, a sort of companion reader to TR-4571. And the best part?

It’s only FOUR PAGES LONG.

Check it out here:

http://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-4571-a.pdf

Introducing the NetApp FlexGroup Best Practice Guide!

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A while back, I wrote a blog post on the new scale out file system feature called NetApp FlexGroup. In that blog, I went over some of the details of what a FlexGroup volume is, where they’re used, etc.

ONTAP 9.1RC2 recently was released, which added SMB protocol support. And today, TR-4571: NetApp FlexGroup Best Practices and Implementation Guide is publicly available!

Have a look at the TR and send comments or questions to flexgroups-info@netapp.com, or post them to this blog’s comments section.

Happy reading!

ONTAP 9.1 RC1 is now available!

For info about ONTAP 9.0, see:

ONTAP 9 RC1 is now available!

ONTAP 9.0 is now generally available (GA)!

While many of the features of ONTAP 9.1 were announced at Insight 2016 in Las Vegas, the official release of the software wasn’t scheduled until the first week of October, which was the week after the conference.

For Insight Las Vegas highlights, see http://www.netapp-insight.com/las-vegas-highlights.

Get used to more features being released for ONTAP in the coming years. We’ve sped up the release cycle to get more cool stuff out faster!

But now, ONTAP 9.1 RC1 available!

That’s right – the next major release of ONTAP is now available. If you have concerns over the “RC” designation, allow me to recap what I mentioned in a previous blog post:

RC versions have completed a rigorous set of internal NetApp tests and are are deemed ready for public consumption. Each release candidate would provide bug fixes that eventually lead up to the GA edition. Keep in mind that all release candidates are fully supported by NetApp, even if there is a GA version available. However, while RC is perfectly fine to run in production environments, GA is the recommended version of any ONTAP software release.

For a more official take on it, see the NetApp link:

http://mysupport.netapp.com/NOW/products/ontap_releasemodel/post70.shtml

What’s new in ONTAP 9.1?

At a high level, ONTAP 9.1 brings:

If you have questions about any of the above, leave a comment and I’ll address them in a future blog post.

Happy upgrading!