Behind the Scenes Episode 289 – NetApp and Rubrik: Better Together

Welcome to the Episode 289, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, we discuss the latest news in the NetApp/Rubrik partnership and how Rubrik works with Ben Kendall (Alliances Technical Partner Manager, Americas at Rubrik, https://www.linkedin.com/in/ben-kendall-6436609/) and PF Guglielmi (Alliances Field CTO @pfguglielmi) of Rubrik and Chris Maino (Manager, Americas Solutions Architects, chris.maino@netapp.com) of NetApp.

For more information:

https://www.rubrik.com/en/partners/technology-partners/netapp

https://www.rubrik.com/en/company/newsroom/press-releases/21/rubrik-and-netapp-extend-partnership

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want a searchable transcript of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 289 – NetApp and Rubrik: Better Together – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback (or if you need a full text transcript – Gong does not support sharing those yet) on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

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Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

How to see data transfer on an ONTAP cluster network

ONTAP clusters utilize a backend cluster network to allow multiple HA pairs to communicate and provide more scale for performance and capacity. This is done by allowing you to nondisruptively add new nodes (and, as a result, capacity and compute) into a cluster. Data will be accessible regardless of where you connect in the cluster. You can scale up to 24 nodes for NAS-only clusters, while being able to mix different HA pair types in the same cluster if you choose to offer different service levels for storage (such as performance tiers, capacity tiers, etc).

Network interfaces that serve data to clients live on physical ports on nodes and are floating/virtual IP addresses that can move to/from any node in the cluster. File systems for NAS are defined by Storage Virtual Machines (SVMs) and volumes. The SVMs own the IP addresses you would use to access data.

When using NAS (CIFS/SMB/NFS) for data access, you can connect to a data interface in the SVM that lives on any node in the cluster, regardless of where the data volume resides. The following graphic shows how that happens.

When you access a NAS volume on a data interface on the same node as the data volume, ONTAP can “cheat” a little and directly interact with that volume without having to do extra work.

If that data interface is on a different node than where the volume resides, then the NAS packet gets packaged up as a proprietary protocol and shipped over the cluster network backend to the node where the volume lives. This volume/node relationship is stored in an internal database in ONTAP so we always have a map to find volumes quickly. Once the NAS packet arrives on the destination node, it gets unpackaged, processed and then the response to the client goes back out the way it came.

Traversing the cluster network has a bit of a latency cost, however, as the packaging/unpackaging/traversal takes some time (more time than a local request). This manifests into slightly less performance for those workloads. The impact of that performance hit is negligible in most environments, but for latency-sensitive applications, there might be some noticeable performance degradation.

There are protocol features that help mitigate the remote I/O that can occur in a cluster, such as SMB node referrals and pNFS, but in scenarios where you can’t use either of those (SMB node referrals didn’t use Kerberos in earlier Windows versions; pNFS needs NFSv4.1 and later), then you’re going to likely have remote cluster traffic. As mentioned, in most cases this isn’t an issue, but it may be useful to have an easy way to find out if an ONTAP cluster is doing remote/cluster traffic.

Cluster level – Statistics show-periodic

To get a cluster-wide view if there is remote traffic on the cluster, you can use the advanced priv command “statistics show-periodic.” This command gives a wealth of information by default, such as:

  • CPU average/busy
  • Total ops/NFS ops/CIFS ops
  • FlexCache ops
  • Total data recieved/sent (Data and cluster network throughput)
  • Data received/sent (Data throughput only)
  • Cluster received/sent (Cluster throughput only)
  • Cluster busy % (how busy the cluster network is)
  • Disk reads/writes
  • Packets sent/received

We also have options to limit the intervals, define SVMs/vservers, etc.

::*> statistics show-periodic ?
[[-object] ] *Object
[ -instance ] *Instance
[ -counter ] *Counter
[ -preset ] *Preset
[ -node ] *Node
[ -vserver ] *Vserver
[ -interval ] *Interval in Seconds (default: 2)
[ -iterations ] *Number of Iterations (default: 0)
[ -summary {true|false} ] *Print Summary (default: true)
[ -filter ] *Filter Data

But for backend cluster traffic, we only care about a few of those, so we can filter the iterations for only what we want to view. In this case, I just want to look at the data sent/received and the cluster busy %.

::*> statistics show-periodic -counter total-recv|total-sent|data-recv|data-sent|cluster-recv|cluster-sent|cluster-busy

When I do that, I get a cleaner, easier to read capture. This is what it looks like when we have remote traffic. This is an NFSv4.1 workload without pNFS, using a mount wsize of 64K.

cluster1: cluster.cluster: 5/11/2021 14:01:49
    total    total     data     data cluster  cluster  cluster
     recv     sent     recv     sent    busy     recv     sent
 -------- -------- -------- -------- ------- -------- --------
    157MB   4.85MB    148MB   3.46MB      0%   8.76MB   1.39MB
    241MB   70.2MB    197MB   4.68MB      1%   43.1MB   65.5MB
    269MB    111MB    191MB   4.41MB      4%   78.1MB    107MB
    329MB   92.5MB    196MB   4.52MB      4%    133MB   88.0MB
    357MB    117MB    246MB   5.68MB      2%    111MB    111MB
    217MB   27.1MB    197MB   4.55MB      1%   20.3MB   22.5MB
    287MB   30.4MB    258MB   5.91MB      1%   28.7MB   24.5MB
    205MB   28.1MB    176MB   4.03MB      1%   28.9MB   24.1MB
cluster1: cluster.cluster: 5/11/2021 14:01:57
    total    total     data     data cluster  cluster  cluster
     recv     sent     recv     sent    busy     recv     sent
 -------- -------- -------- -------- ------- -------- --------
Minimums:
    157MB   4.85MB    148MB   3.46MB      0%   8.76MB   1.39MB
Averages for 8 samples:
    258MB   60.3MB    201MB   4.66MB      1%   56.5MB   55.7MB
Maximums:
    357MB    117MB    258MB   5.91MB      4%    133MB    111MB

As we can see, there is an average of 55.7MB sent and 56.5MB received over the cluster network each second; this accounts for an average of 1% of the available bandwidth, which means we have plenty of cluster network utilization left over.

When we look at the latency for this workload, this is what we see. (Using qos statistics latency show)

Policy Group            Latency
-------------------- ----------
-total-                364.00us
extreme-fixed          364.00us
-total-                619.00us
extreme-fixed          619.00us
-total-                490.00us
extreme-fixed          490.00us
-total-                409.00us
extreme-fixed          409.00us
-total-                422.00us
extreme-fixed          422.00us
-total-                474.00us
extreme-fixed          474.00us
-total-                412.00us
extreme-fixed          412.00us
-total-                372.00us
extreme-fixed          372.00us
-total-                475.00us
extreme-fixed          475.00us
-total-                436.00us
extreme-fixed          436.00us
-total-                474.00us
extreme-fixed          474.00us

This is what the cluster network looks like when I use pNFS for data locality:

cluster1: cluster.cluster: 5/11/2021 14:18:19
    total    total     data     data cluster  cluster  cluster
     recv     sent     recv     sent    busy     recv     sent
 -------- -------- -------- -------- ------- -------- --------
    208MB   6.24MB    206MB   4.76MB      0%   1.56MB   1.47MB
    214MB   5.37MB    213MB   4.85MB      0%    555KB    538KB
    214MB   6.27MB    213MB   4.80MB      0%   1.46MB   1.47MB
    219MB   5.95MB    219MB   5.40MB      0%    572KB    560KB
    318MB   8.91MB    317MB   7.44MB      0%   1.46MB   1.47MB
    203MB   5.16MB    203MB   4.62MB      0%    560KB    548KB
    205MB   6.09MB    204MB   4.64MB      0%   1.44MB   1.45MB
cluster1: cluster.cluster: 5/11/2021 14:18:26
    total    total     data     data cluster  cluster  cluster
     recv     sent     recv     sent    busy     recv     sent
 -------- -------- -------- -------- ------- -------- --------
Minimums:
    203MB   5.16MB    203MB   4.62MB      0%    555KB    538KB
Averages for 7 samples:
    226MB   6.28MB    225MB   5.22MB      0%   1.08MB   1.07MB
Maximums:
    318MB   8.91MB    317MB   7.44MB      0%   1.56MB   1.47MB

There is barely any cluster traffic other than the normal cluster operations. The “data” and “total” sent/received is nearly identical.

And the latency was an average of .1 ms lower.

Policy Group            Latency
-------------------- ----------

-total-                323.00us
extreme-fixed          323.00us
-total-                323.00us
extreme-fixed          323.00us
-total-                325.00us
extreme-fixed          325.00us
-total-                336.00us
extreme-fixed          336.00us
-total-                325.00us
extreme-fixed          325.00us
-total-                328.00us
extreme-fixed          328.00us
-total-                334.00us
extreme-fixed          334.00us
-total-                341.00us
extreme-fixed          341.00us
-total-                336.00us
extreme-fixed          336.00us
-total-                330.00us
extreme-fixed          330.00us

Try it out and see for yourself! If you have questions or comments, enter them below.

How to identify a file or folder in ONTAP in NFS packet traces

When you’re troubleshooting NFS issues, sometimes you have to collect a packet capture to see what’s going on. But the issue is, packet captures don’t really tell you the file or folder names. I like to use Wireshark for Mac and Windows, and regular old tcpdump for Linux. For ONTAP, you can run packet captures using this KB (requires NetApp login):

How to capture packet traces (tcpdump) on ONTAP 9.2+ systems

By default, Wireshark shows NFS packets like this ACCESS call. We see a FH, which is in hex, and then we see another filehandle that’s even more unreadable. We’ll occasionally see file names in the trace (like copy-file below), but if we need to find out why an ACCESS call fails, we’ll have difficulty:

Luckily, Wireshark has some built-in stuff to crack open those NFS file handles in ONTAP.

Also, check out this new blog:

How to Map File and Folder Locations to NetApp ONTAP FlexGroup Member Volumes with XCP

Changing Wireshark Settings

First, we’d want to set the NFS preferences. That’s done via Edit -> Preferences and then by clicking on “Protocols” in the left hand menu and selecting NFS:

Here, you’ll see some options that you can read more about by mousing over them:

I just select them all.

When we go to the packet we want to analyze, we can right click and select “Decode As…”:

This brings up the “Decode As” window. Here, we have “NFS File Handle Types” pre-populated. Double-click (none) under “Current” and you get a drop down menu. You’ll get some options for NFS, including…. ONTAP! In this case, since I’m using clustered ONTAP, I select ontap_gx_v3. (GX is what clustered ONTAP was before clustered ONTAP was clustered ONTAP):

If you click “OK” it will apply to the current session only. If you click “Save” it will keep those preferences every time.

Now, when the ACCESS packet is displayed, I get WAY more information about the file in question and they’re translated to decimal values.

Those still don’t mean a lot to us, but I’ll get to that.

Mapping file handle values to files in ONTAP

Now, we can use the ONTAP CLI and the packet capture to discern exactly what file has that ACCESS call.

Every volume in ONTAP has a unique identifier called a “Master Set ID” (or MSID). You can see the volume’s MSID with the following diag priv command:

cluster::*> vol show -vserver DEMO -volume vol2 -fields msid
vserver volume  msid
------- ------- -----------
DEMO    vol2    2163230318

If you know the volume name you’re troubleshooting, then that makes life easier – just use find in the packet details.

If you don’t, the MSID can be found in a packet trace in the ACCESS reply as the “fsid”:

You can then find the volume name and exported path with the MSID in the ONTAP CLI with:

cluster::*> set diag; vol show -vserver DEMO -msid  2163230318 -fields volume,junction-path
vserver volume  junction-path
------- ------- ----------- 
DEMO    vol2    /vol2 

File and directory handles are constructed using that MSID, which is why each volume is considered a distinct filesystem. But we don’t care about that, because Wireshark figures all that out for us and we can use the ONTAP CLI to figure it out as well.

The pertinent information in the trace as it maps to the files and folders are:

  • Spin file id = inode number in ONTAP
  • Spin file unique id = file generation number
  • File id = inode number as seen by the NFS client

If you know the volume and file or folder’s name, you can easily find the inode number in ONTAP with this command:

cluster::*> set advanced; showfh -vserver DEMO /vol/vol2/folder
Vserver                Path
---------------------- ---------------------------
DEMO                   /vol/vol2/folder
flags   snapid fileid    generation fsid       msid         dsid
------- ------ --------- ---------- ---------- ------------ ------------
0x8000  0      0x658e    0x227ed312 -          -            0x1639

In the above, the values are in hex, but we can translate with a hex converter, like this one:

https://www.rapidtables.com/convert/number/hex-to-decimal.html

So, for the values we got:

  • file ID (inode) 0x658e = 25998
  • generation ID 0x227ed312 = 578736914

In the trace, that matches up:

Finding file names and paths by inode number

But what happens if you don’t know the file name and just have the information from the trace?

One way is to use the nodeshell level command “inodepath.”

::*> node run -node node1 inodepath -v files 15447
Inode 15447 in volume files (fsid 0x142a) has 1 name.
Volume UUID is: 76a69b93-cc2f-11ea-b16f-00a098696eda
[ 1] Primary pathname = /vol/files/newapps/user1-file-smb

This will work with a FlexGroup volume as well, provided you know the node and the member volume where the file lives (see “How to Map File and Folder Locations to NetApp ONTAP FlexGroup Member Volumes with XCP” for a way to figure that info out).

::*> node run -node node2 inodepath -v FG2__0007 5292
Inode 5292 in volume FG2__0007 (fsid 0x1639) has 1 name.
Volume UUID is: 87b14652-9685-11eb-81bf-00a0986b1223
[ 1] Primary pathname = /vol/FG2/copy-file-finder

There’s also a diag privilege command in ONTAP for that. The caveat is it can be dangerous to run, especially if you make a mistake in running it. (And when I say dangerous, I mean best case, it hangs your CLI session for a while; worst case, it panics the node.) If possible, use inodepath instead.

Here’s how we could use the volume name and inode number to find the file name. For a FlexVol volume, it’s simple:

cluster::*> vol explore -format inode -scope volname.inode -dump name

For example:

cluster::*> volume explore -format inode -scope files.15447 -dump name
name=/newapps/user1-file-smb

With a FlexGroup volume, however, it’s a little more complicated, as there are member volumes to take into account and there’s no easy way for ONTAP to discern which FlexGroup member volume has the file, since ONTAP inode numbers can be reused in different member volumes. This is because the file IDs presented to NFS clients are created using the inode numbers and things like the member volume’s MSID (which is different than the FlexGroup’s MSID).

To make this happen with volume explore, we’d be working in reverse – listing the contents of the volume’s files/folders, then using the inode number of the parent folder, listing those, etc. With high file count environments, this is basically an impossibility.

In that case, we’d need to use an NFS client to discover the file name associated with the inode number in question.

From the client, we have two commands to find an inode number for a file. In this case we know the file’s location and name:

# ls -i /mnt/client1/copy-file-finder
4133624749 /mnt/client1/copy-file-finder
#stat copy-file-finder
File: ‘copy-file-finder’
Size: 12 Blocks: 0 IO Block: 1048576 regular file
Device: 2eh/46d Inode: 4133624749 Links: 1
Access: (0555/-r-xr-xr-x) Uid: ( 1102/ prof1) Gid: (10002/ProfGroup)
Access: 2021-04-14 11:47:45.579879000 -0400
Modify: 2021-04-14 11:47:45.588875000 -0400
Change: 2021-04-14 17:34:07.364283000 -0400
Birth: -

In a packet trace, that inode number is “fileid” and found in REPLY calls, such as GETATTR:

If we only know the inode number (as if we got it from a packet trace), we can use the number on the client to find the file name. One way is with “find”:

# find /path/to/mountpoint -inum <inodenumber>

For example:

# find /mnt/client1 -inum 4133624749
/mnt/client1/copy-file-finder

“find” can take a while – especially in a high file count environment, so we could also use XCP.

# xcp -l -match 'fileid== <inodenumber>' server1:/export

In this case:

# xcp -l -match 'fileid== 4133624749' DEMO:/FG2
XCP 1.6.1; (c) 2021 NetApp, Inc.; Licensed to Justin Parisi [NetApp Inc] until Tue Jun 22 12:34:48 2021

r-xr-xr-x --- 1102 10002 12 0 12d23h FG2/copy-file-finder

Filtered: 8173 did not match

Xcp command : xcp -l -match fileid== 4133624749 DEMO:/FG2
Stats : 8,174 scanned, 1 matched
Speed : 1.47 MiB in (2.10 MiB/s), 8.61 KiB out (12.3 KiB/s)
Total Time : 0s.
STATUS : PASSED

Hope this helps you find files in your NFS filesystem! If you have questions or comments, leave them below.

Brand new tech report: Multiprotocol NAS Best Practices in ONTAP

I don’t like to admit to being a procrastinator, but…

Lazy Sloth Drawing (Page 1) - Line.17QQ.com
(Not actually a sloth)

Four years ago, I said this:

And people have asked about it a few times since then. To be fair, I did say “will be a ways out…”

In actuality, I started that TR in March of 2017. And then again in February of 2019. And then started all over when the pandemic hit, because what else did I have going on? 🙂

And it’s not like I haven’t done *stuff* in that time.

The trouble was, I do multiprotocol NAS every day, so I think I had writer’s block because I didn’t know where to start and the challenge of writing an entire TR on the subject without making it 100-200 pages like some of the others I’ve written was… daunting. But, it’s finally done. And the actual content is under 100 pages!

Topics include:

  • NFS and SMB best practices/tips
  • Name mapping explanations and best practices
  • Name service information
  • CIFS Symlink information
  • Advanced multiprotocol NAS concepts

Multiprotocol NAS Best Practices in ONTAP

If you have any comments/questions, feel free to comment!

Behind the Scenes – Episode 281: Veeam is Turning it Up to 11

Welcome to the Episode 281, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, Veeam’s Adam Bergh (@ajbergh) and vMiss, Melissa Palmer (@vMiss33) join us to discuss the newest Veeam 11 release and how it’s taking backup and restores to the next level.

For more information:

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want an AI transcribed copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 280: Veeam is Turning it Up to 11 (Transcript)

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Or, click the “view transcript” button:

gong-transcript

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes – Episode 270: NetApp ONTAP File Systems Analytics

Welcome to the Episode 270, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, we do a deep dive into the new ONTAP 9.8 feature in System Manager – File Systems Analytics – and why it’s improving the lives of storage administrators.

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want an AI transcribed copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 270: NetApp ONTAP File Systems Analytics – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Or, click the “view transcript” button:

gong-transcript

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes – Episode 269: Medical Imaging Workloads with NetApp Solutions

Welcome to the Episode 269, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week on the podcast, NetApp’s Tony Turner (@tnyturner) drops by to talk about how NetApp solutions are driving successful deployments for medical imaging workloads.

For more information:

FlexPod for Medical Imaging
https://www.netapp.com/pdf.html?item=/media/19793-tr-4865.pdf

Podcast Transcriptions

If you want an AI transcribed copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 269: Medical Imaging Workloads with NetApp Solutions – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Or, click the “view transcript” button:

gong-transcript

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Tech ONTAP Community

We also now have a presence on the NetApp Communities page. You can subscribe there to get emails when we have new episodes.

Tech ONTAP Podcast Community

techontap_banner2

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

You can also find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Behind the Scenes – Episode 261: How DreamWorks Animation Creates New Worlds on NetApp ONTAP

Welcome to the Episode 261, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week, I was lucky enough to snag a long-time NetApp customer and engineering partner DreamWorks Animation to talk about how the studio leverages NetApp ONTAP to build some of the most creative and effects intensive CG animated films on the planet.

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 261: How DreamWorks Animation Creates New Worlds on NetApp ONTAP – Transcript

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Or, click the “view transcript” button:

gong-transcript

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Find the Tech ONTAP Podcast on:

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 229 – Veeam 10

Welcome to the Episode 229, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week on the podcast, Michael Cade (@michaelcade1) and Adam Bergh (@ajbergh) from Veeam join myself and TME Jeannine Walter (@j9walter) to discuss the latest release of Veeam.

For more information on Veeam 10:

https://www.veeam.com/blog/v10-top-new-features-vanguards.html

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 229: Veeam 10 – Podcast Transcription

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 228 – FlexPod for Industry Verticals – Healthcare

Welcome to the Episode 228, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

2019-insight-design2-warhol-gophers

This week on the podcast, we discuss FlexPod and the new initiative to create validated designs for industry verticals. First up – Healthcare and Epic software with NetApp Sr. Product Manager for Converged Infrastructure, Ketan Mota (ketan.mota@netapp.com) and NetApp Solutions Architect for Healthcare, Brian O’Mahony (omahony@netapp.com).

For links to the FlexPod technical reports:

FlexPod for Epic TRs

FlexPod for MEDITECH TRs

And general FlexPod information:

https://flexpod.com/

https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/design-zone/data-center-design-guides/flexpod-design-guides.html

https://www.netapp.com/us/products/converged-systems/flexpod-converged-infrastructure.aspx

Podcast Transcriptions

We also are piloting a new transcription service, so if you want a written copy of the episode, check it out here (just set expectations accordingly):

Episode 228: FlexPod for Industry Verticals: Healthcare – Transcription

Just use the search field to look for words you want to read more about. (For example, search for “storage”)

transcript.png

Be sure to give us feedback on the transcription in the comments here or via podcast@netapp.com! If you have requests for other previous episode transcriptions, let me know!

Finding the Podcast

You can find this week’s episode here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here: