Behind the Scenes: Episode 148 – An Introduction to Cloud Volume Services

Welcome to the Episode 148, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

tot-gopher

This week on the podcast, we invited Eiki Hrafnsson (@EirikurH), Chief Architect, Data Fabric, and Sr. Manager, Product Marketing, Cloud, Ingo Fuchs (@IngoFuchs) to give us the lowdown on what Cloud Volume Services are and where people are expected to use them. 

You can also check out Ingo’s Cloud Field Day presentation on Cloud Volume Services here: 

http://techfieldday.com/appearance/netapp-presents-at-cloud-field-day-3/  

Also, you can investigate Cloud Volume Services on your own here: 

https://cloud.netapp.com/cloud-volumes  

Or check out this demo with Ingo.

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

This week’s episode is here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

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Behind the Scenes: Episode 147 – SPC-1v3 Results – NetApp AFF A800

Welcome to the Episode 147, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

tot-gopher

This week on the podcast, we find out how the new NetApp A800 system fared in the rigorous SPC-1 v3 storage benchmarks. Can the NVMe attached SSDs truly help reduce latency while maintaining high number of IOPs? Performance TME Dan Isaacs (@danisaacs) and the workload engineering team of Scott Lane, Jim Laing and Joe Scott join us to discuss! 

Check out the published results here: 

http://spcresults.org/benchmarks/results/spc1-spc1e#A32007

And the official NetApp blog:

https://blog.netapp.com/nvme-benchmark-spc-1-testing-validates-breakthrough-performance-aff/

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

This week’s episode is here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 146 – OpenStack Summit 2018 Recap

Welcome to the Episode 146, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

tot-gopher

This week on the podcast, we bring in some of the NetApp OpenStack crew to discuss OpenStack Summit 2018 in Vancouver. Join Product Marketing Manager Pete Brey (@cloudstorageguy) and TMEs Amit Borulkar (@amit_borulkar) and David Blackwell as we discuss all the happenings of the conferences, as well as Amit’s new OpenStack FlexPod Cisco Validated Design!

Link to the CVD:

https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/unified_computing/ucs/UCS_CVDs/flexpodsf_openstack_osp10_design.html

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

This week’s episode is here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

How to find average file size and largest file size using XCP

If you use NetApp ONTAP to host NAS shares (CIFS or NFS) and have too many files and folders to count, then you know how challenging it can be to figure out file information in your environment in a quick, efficient and effective way.

This becomes doubly important when you are thinking of migrating NAS data from FlexVol volumes to FlexGroup volumes, because there is some work up front that needs to be done to ensure you size the capacity of the FlexGroup and its member volumes correctly. TR-4571 covers some of that in detail, but it basically says “know your average file size.” It currently doesn’t tell you *how* to do that (though it will eventually). This blog attempts to fill that gap.

XCP

I’ve written previously about XCP here:

Generally speaking, it’s been to tout the data migration capabilities of the tool. But, in this case, I want to highlight the “xcp scan” capability.

XCP scan allows you to use multiple, parallel threads to analyze an unstructured NAS share much more quickly than you could with basic tools like rsync, du, etc.

The NFS version of XCP also allows you to output this scan to a file (HTML, XML, etc) to generate a report about the scanned data. It even does the math for you and finds the largest (max) file size and average file size!

xcpfilesize

The command I ran to get this information was:

# xcp scan -md5 -stats -html SERVER:/volume/path > filename.html

That’s it! XCP will scan and write to a file. You can also get info about the top five file consumers (by number and capacity) by owner, as well as get some nifty graphs. (Pro tip: Managers love graphs!)

xcp-graphs

What if I only have SMB/CIFS data?

Currently, XCP for SMB doesn’t support output to HTML files. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun, too!

You can stand up a VM using CentOS or whatever your favorite Linux kernel is and use XCP for NFS to scan data – provided the client has the necessary access to do so and you can score an NFS license (even if it’s eval). XCP scans are read-only, so you shouldn’t have issues running them.

Just keep in mind the following:

NFS to shares that have traditionally been SMB/CIFS-only are likely NTFS security style. This means that the user you are accessing the data as (for example, root) should be able to map to a valid Windows user that has read access to the data. NFS clients that access NTFS security style volumes map to Windows users to figure out permissions. I cover that here:

Mixed perceptions with NetApp multiprotocol NAS access

You can check the volume security style in two ways:

  • CLI with the command
    ::> volume show -volume [volname] -fields security-style
  • OnCommand System Manager under the “Storage -> Qtrees” section (yea, yea… I know. Volumes != Qtrees)

ocsm-qtree

To check if the user you are attempting to access the volume via NFS with maps to a valid and expected Windows user, use this CLI command from diag privilege:

::> set diag
::*> diag secd name-mapping show -node node1 -vserver DEMO -direction unix-win -name prof1

'prof1' maps to 'NTAP\prof1'

To see what Windows groups this user would be a member of (and thus would get access to files and folders that have those groups assigned), use this diag privilege command:

::*> diag secd authentication show-creds -node ontap9-tme-8040-01 -vserver DEMO -unix-user-name prof1

UNIX UID: prof1 <> Windows User: NTAP\prof1 (Windows Domain User)

GID: ProfGroup
 Supplementary GIDs:
 ProfGroup
 group1
 group2
 group3
 sharedgroup

Primary Group SID: NTAP\DomainUsers (Windows Domain group)

Windows Membership:
 NTAP\group2 (Windows Domain group)
 NTAP\DomainUsers (Windows Domain group)
 NTAP\sharedgroup (Windows Domain group)
 NTAP\group1 (Windows Domain group)
 NTAP\group3 (Windows Domain group)
 NTAP\ProfGroup (Windows Domain group)
 Service asserted identity (Windows Well known group)
 BUILTIN\Users (Windows Alias)
 User is also a member of Everyone, Authenticated Users, and Network Users

Privileges (0x2080):
 SeChangeNotifyPrivilege

If you want to run XCP as root and want it to have administrator level access, you can create a name mapping. This is what I have in my SVM:

::> vserver name-mapping show -vserver DEMO -direction unix-win

Vserver: DEMO
Direction: unix-win
Position Hostname         IP Address/Mask
-------- ---------------- ----------------
1        -                -                Pattern: root
                                           Replacement: DEMO\\administrator

To create a name mapping for root to map to administrator:

::> vserver name-mapping create -vserver DEMO -direction unix-win -position 1 -pattern root -replacement DEMO\\administrator

Keep in mind that backup software often has this level of rights to files and folders, and the XCP scan is read-only, so there shouldn’t be any issue. If you are worried about making root an administrator, create a new Windows user for it to map to (for example, DOMAIN\xcp) and add it to the Backup Operators Windows Group.

In my lab, I ran a scan on a NTFS security style volume called “xcp_ntfs_src”:

::*> vserver security file-directory show -vserver DEMO -path /xcp_ntfs_src

Vserver: DEMO
 File Path: /xcp_ntfs_src
 File Inode Number: 64
 Security Style: ntfs
 Effective Style: ntfs
 DOS Attributes: 10
 DOS Attributes in Text: ----D---
Expanded Dos Attributes: -
 UNIX User Id: 0
 UNIX Group Id: 0
 UNIX Mode Bits: 777
 UNIX Mode Bits in Text: rwxrwxrwx
 ACLs: NTFS Security Descriptor
 Control:0x8014
 Owner:NTAP\prof1
 Group:BUILTIN\Administrators
 DACL - ACEs
 ALLOW-BUILTIN\Administrators-0x1f01ff-OI|CI
 ALLOW-DEMO\Administrator-0x1f01ff-OI|CI
 ALLOW-Everyone-0x100020-OI|CI
 ALLOW-NTAP\student1-0x120089-OI|CI
 ALLOW-NTAP\student2-0x120089-OI|CI

I used this command and nearly 600,000 objects were scanned in 25 seconds:

# xcp scan -md5 -stats -html 10.x.x.x:/xcp_ntfs_src > xcp-ntfs.html
XCP 1.3D1-8ae2672; (c) 2018 NetApp, Inc.; Licensed to Justin Parisi [NetApp Inc] until Tue Sep 4 13:23:07 2018

126,915 scanned, 85,900 summed, 43.8 MiB in (8.75 MiB/s), 14.5 MiB out (2.89 MiB/s), 5s
 260,140 scanned, 187,900 summed, 91.6 MiB in (9.50 MiB/s), 31.3 MiB out (3.34 MiB/s), 10s
 385,100 scanned, 303,900 summed, 140 MiB in (9.60 MiB/s), 49.9 MiB out (3.71 MiB/s), 15s
 516,070 scanned, 406,530 summed, 187 MiB in (9.45 MiB/s), 66.7 MiB out (3.36 MiB/s), 20s
Sending statistics...
 594,100 scanned, 495,000 summed, 220 MiB in (6.02 MiB/s), 80.5 MiB out (2.56 MiB/s), 25s
594,100 scanned, 495,000 summed, 220 MiB in (8.45 MiB/s), 80.5 MiB out (3.10 MiB/s), 25s.

This was the resulting report:

xcp-ntfs

Happy scanning!

Behind the Scenes: Episode 145 – AI, Machine Learning and ONTAP with Santosh Rao

Welcome to the Episode 145, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

tot-gopher

This week on the podcast, NetApp Senior Technical Director Santosh Rao (@santorao) joins us to talk about how NetApp and NVidia are partnering to enhance AI solutions with the DGX-1, ONTAP and FlexGroup volumes using NFS!

You can find more information in the following links:

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

This week’s episode is here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here:

Workaround for Mac Finder errors when unzipping files in ONTAP

ONTAP allows you to mount volumes to other volumes in a Storage Virtual Machine, which provides a way for storage administrators to create their own folder structures across multiple nodes in a cluster. This is useful when you want to ensure the workload gets spread across nodes, but you can’t use FlexGroup volumes for whatever reason.

This graphic shows how that can work:

junctioned-volumes.png

In NAS environments, a client will ask for a file or folder location and ONTAP will re-direct the traffic to wherever that object lives. This is supposed to be transparent to the client, provided they follow standard NAS deployment steps.

However, not all NAS clients are created equal. Sometimes, Linux serves up SMB and will do things differently than Microsoft does. Windows also will do NFS, but it doesn’t entirely follow the NFS RFCs. So, occasionally, ONTAP doesn’t expect how a client handles something and stuff breaks.

Mac Finder

If you’ve ever used a Mac, you’ll know that the Finder can do somethings a little differently than the Terminal does. In this particular issue, we’ll focus on how Finder unzips files (when you double-click the file) in volumes that are mounted to other volumes in ONTAP.

One of our customers hit this issue, and after poking around a little bit, I figured out how to workaround the issue.

Here’s what they were doing:

  • SMB to Mac clients
  • Shares at the parent FlexVol level (ie, /vol1
  • FlexVols mounted to other FlexVols several levels deep (ie, /vol1/vol2/vol3)

When files are unzipped after accessing a share at a higher level and then drilling down into other folders (which are actually FlexVols mounted to other FlexVols), then unzipping in Finder via double-click fails.

When the shares are mounted at the same level as the FlexVol where the unzip is attempted, unzip works. When the Terminal is used to unzip, it works.

However, when your users refuse to use/are unable to use the Terminal and you don’t want to create hundreds of shares just to work around one issue, it’s an untenable situation.

So, I decided to dig into the issue…

Reproducing the issue

The best way to troubleshoot problems is to set up a lab environment and try to recreate the problem. This allows you freedom to gather logs, packet traces, etc. without bothering your customer or end user. So, I brought my trusty old 2011 MacBook running OS Sierra and mounted the SMB share in question.

These are the volumes and their junction paths:

DEMO inodes /shared/inodes
DEMO shared /shared

This is the share:

 Vserver: DEMO
 Share: shared
 CIFS Server NetBIOS Name: DEMO
 Path: /shared
 Share Properties: oplocks
 browsable
 changenotify
 show-previous-versions
 Symlink Properties: symlinks
 File Mode Creation Mask: -
 Directory Mode Creation Mask: -
 Share Comment: -
 Share ACL: Everyone / Full Control
 File Attribute Cache Lifetime: -
 Volume Name: shared
 Offline Files: manual
 Vscan File-Operations Profile: standard
 Maximum Tree Connections on Share: 4294967295
 UNIX Group for File Create: -

I turned up debug logging on the cluster (engage NetApp Support if you want to do this), got a packet trace on the Mac and reproduced the issue right away. Lucky me!

finder-error

I also tried a 3rd party unzip utility (Stuffit Expander) and it unzipped fine. So this was definitely a Finder/ONTAP/NAS interaction problem, which allowed me to focus on that.

Packet traces showed that the Finder was attempting to look for a folder called “.TemporaryItems/folders.501/Cleanup At Startup” but couldn’t find it – and couldn’t create it, apparently either. But it would created folders named “BAH.XXXX” instead, and they wouldn’t get cleaned up.

So, I thought, why not manually create the folder path, since it wasn’t able to do it on its own?

You can do this through Terminal, or via Finder. Keep in mind that the path above has “folders.501” – 501 is my uid, so check your users uid on the Mac and make sure the folder path is created using that uid. If you have multiple users that access the share, you may need to create multiple folders.xxx in .TemporaryItems.

If you do it via Finder, you may want to enable hidden files. I learned how to do that via this article:

https://ianlunn.co.uk/articles/quickly-showhide-hidden-files-mac-os-x-mavericks/

So I did that and then I unmounted the share and re-mounted, to make sure there wasn’t any weird cache issue lingering. You can check CIFS/SMB sessions, versions, etc with the following command, if you want to make sure they are closed:

cluster::*> cifs session show -vserver DEMO -instance

Vserver: DEMO

Node: node1
 Session ID: 16043510722553971076
 Connection ID: 390771549
 Incoming Data LIF IP Address: 10.x.x.x
 Workstation IP Address: 10.x.x.x
 Authentication Mechanism: NTLMv2
 User Authenticated as: domain-user
 Windows User: NTAP\prof1
 UNIX User: prof1
 Open Shares: 1
 Open Files: 1
 Open Other: 0
 Connected Time: 7m 49s
 Idle Time: 6m 2s
 Protocol Version: SMB3
 Continuously Available: No
 Is Session Signed: true
 NetBIOS Name: -
 SMB Encryption Status: unencrypted
 Connection Count: 1

Once I reconnected with the newly created folder path, double-click unzip worked perfectly!

Check it out yourself:

Note: You *may* have to enable the option is-use-junctions-as-reparse-points-enabled on your CIFS server. I haven’t tested with it off and on thoroughly, but I saw some inconsistency when it was disabled. For the record, it’s on by default.

You can check with:

::*> cifs options show -fields is-use-junctions-as-reparse-points-enabled

Give it a try and let me know how it works for you in the comments!

ONTAP 9.4 is now GA!

ONTAP 9 is on a new cadence model, which brings a new release every 6 months.

Today, ONTAP 9.4GA is available here!

http://mysupport.netapp.com/NOW/download/software/ontap/9.4

sully-hearye

Also, check out the documentation center:

docs.netapp.com/ontap-9/index.jsp

NetApp published a general overview blog on NVMe with Joel Reich here:

https://blog.netapp.com/the-future-is-here-ai-ready-cloud-connected-all-flash-storage-with-nvme/

Jeff Baxter’s blog is here:

https://blog.netapp.com/netapp-ontap-9-4-is-ga-modernize-your-it-architecture-with-cloud-connected-flash/

We also did an overview podcast:

And a few others on ONTAP 9.4:

And a lightboard video:

This is a brief list of the new features…

Cloud!

Fabric Pool enhancements include:

  • Tiering to Microsoft Azure Blob storage
  • Tiering of active file system data
  • Predictive performance with the object storage profiler
  • Predictive space savings for Fabric Pool before you enable it

Efficiency!

  • Increased Snapshot limits – 1,023 per volume!
  • Background aggregate level deduplication scanner
  • Automatic enable of all storage efficiencies on data protection volumes
  • Support for 30TB SAS attached SSDs
  • Deduplication across snapshots and active file system
  • Reduced node root volume sizes on new platforms

Performance!

  • End-to-end NVMe support (NVMe attached drives in the new A800 + NVMe over fibre channel support)
  • SMB multichannel support
  • 100GbE Ethernet support

Security!

  • Secure purge of files (crypto-shred!)
  • Secure boot via UEFI on new platforms
  • Validated ONTAP images
  • Protected controller reboot

I went into more detail about the features in the RC blog here:

ONTAP 9.4RC1 is now available!

For more information, check out these brief videos for some lightboard action on new ONTAP 9.4 stuff:

Some other information on the launch can be found as follows:

GCP Cloud Volumes for NFS with native access to the GCP tool suite (Google Cloud)
https://blog.netapp.com/sweet-new-storage-service-from-netapp-for-google-cloud-platform/ 

Storage Grid Update 11.1
https://blog.netapp.com/storagegrid-11-1-and-netapp-hci-the-perfect-one-two-punch-for-scaling-your-environment/ 

A800 and the A220
https://blog.netapp.com/the-future-is-here-ai-ready-cloud-connected-all-flash-storage-with-nvme/ 

ONTAP 9.4 with first to market NVMe/FC support
http://www.demartek.com/Demartek_NetApp_Broadcom_NVMe_over_Fibre_Channel_Evaluation_2018-05.html

New NetApp FlexPod Cisco Validated Designs available!

new20flexpod

In case you weren’t aware, NetApp partners with other vendors, such as Cisco, to create bundled architectures that are co-supported and simple to deploy. These converged infrastructure products are known as “FlexPods” and they go through a rigorous testing and validation process by both NetApp and Cisco to ensure the highest probability of success in deployments.

There are two new Cisco Validated Designs (CVDs) available. I’ll basically be plagiarizing the announcement emails that went out here, because I like converging communications, too. 🙂

FlexPod Datacenter (AFF A300) with Citrix XenDesktop/XenApp for 6000 Seats (credit to Chris Gebhardt – @chrisgeb)

This CVD is a new milestone in user density on the A300 platform running ONTAP 9.3 at 6000 users.  In this CVD we were able to observe peak total values of 83,000 IOPS and a bandwidth of 1750 MB/s at a latency of less than 1ms.  This low latency translates directly into an excellent end-user experience on mixed use case scale testing scenario.

https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/unified_computing/ucs/UCS_CVDs/cisco_ucs_xd715esxi65u1_flexpod.html

The solution provides customers with a blueprint for deploying large scale mixed use case of persistent, nonpersistent & RDS Windows 10 virtual machines on FlexPod.  Cisco & NetApp have stress-tested the limits of the infrastructure during many different scenarios.

Some of the key values of this solution include:

  • NetApp AFF A300array provides industry-leading storage solutions that efficiently handle the most demanding I/O bursts (for example, login storms), profile management, and user data management, deliver simple and flexible business continuance, and help reduce storage cost per desktop.
  • NetApp AFF A300array provides a simple to understand storage architecture for hosting all user data components (VMs, profiles, user data) on the same storage array.
  • NetApp ONTAP 9.3 softwareenables to seamlessly add, upgrade or remove storage from the infrastructure to meet the needs of the virtual desktops.
  • NetApp Virtual Storage Console(VSC) for VMware vSphere hypervisor has deep integrations with vSphere, providing easy-button automation for key storage tasks such as storage repository provisioning, storage resize, data deduplication, directly from vCenter.

 More information on this and other solutions can be found:

Cisco NetApp Website: http://www.cisconetapp.com/

All Flash FAS Datasheet: http://www.netapp.com/us/media/ds-3582.pdf

Additional FlexPod solutions with All Flash FAS, AltaVault, SAP HANA, Microsoft SharePoint, VMware vSphere, Cisco UCS Director and more, can be found:  http://www.netapp.com/us/solutions/flexpod/datacenter/validated-designs.aspx

FlexPod Datacenter with VMware 6.5 Update1 and Cisco ACI 3.1 Solution (credit to Dave Derry)

I am pleased to announce the release of an updated FlexPod Solution –  FlexPod Datacenter with VMware 6.5 Update1 and Cisco ACI 3.1.  This validated FlexPod design (CVD) refreshes FlexPod with All Flash FAS with ONTAP 9.3, Cisco ACI 3.1, and VMware vSphere 6.5 u1.

flexpod-aci.png

This solution continues the momentum of the huge success of NetApp All Flash FAS along with over 5000 Cisco Nexus 9k customers and over 200 production deployments of Cisco ACI in enterprises and service providers.

FlexPod with All Flash FAS and Cisco ACI is the optimal shared infrastructure to deploy a variety of workloads.  FlexPod provides a platform that is both flexible and scalable for multiple use cases and applications.   From virtual desktop infrastructure to SAP®, FlexPod can efficiently and effectively support business-critical applications running simultaneously from the same shared infrastructure. The flexibility and scalability of FlexPod also enable customers to create a right-sized infrastructure that can grow with and adapt to their evolving business requirements.

FlexPod is the leading converged infrastructure with the lowest storage cost per TB of any converged infrastructure in the market, according to IDC.  This coupled with All Flash FAS increases application performance by 20X and with Cisco ACI that provides up to 83% faster network provisioning times for applications compared to existing network provisioning tools.

Use Case Summary

This infrastructure solution validates this design including redundancy, failure and recovery testing:

  • UCS B200-M4 and M5 compute servers, 6300-series fabric interconnects, running UCS Manager 3.2
  • Nexus N9k running in ACI Fabric Mode, 40G end-to-end
  • Cisco APIC managing the Nexus 9k fabric, running ACI 3.1
  • AFF A300 controllers with ONTAP 9.3, with storage connected to the ACI fabric (NFS)
  • OnCommand System Manager, OnCommand Unified Manager, OnCommand Workflow Automation, NetApp Virtual Storage Console for vSphere
  • NetApp SnapDrive and SnapManager
  • VMware vSphere 6.5 u1
  • Validation of FC direct-connect and iSCSI for SAN boot and data access from the fabric interconnects to storage
  • FC, iSCSI, and NFS Storage access
  • NetApp storage QoS to limit load to keep CPU utilization at a recommended level

The FlexPod Datacenter with VMware 6.5 Update1 and Cisco ACI 3.1 design guide is located here:

https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/unified_computing/ucs/UCS_CVDs/flexpod_esxi65u1_n9k_aci_design.html

To review additional validated FlexPod solutions including validated infrastructure and workload solutions, see this link:   http://www.netapp.com/us/solutions/flexpod/datacenter/validated-designs.aspx

We also will have a podcast soon that covers the CVD for OpenStack in a FlexPod. Stay tuned for that!

What am I supposed to do with “ONTAP Select”?

A few years ago, NetApp released a software-only version of ONTAP (or, software-defined, if you prefer), in which you could install enterprise-ready ONTAP on pretty much any hardware you wanted, so long as the hardware specs met the minimum requirements.

Originally, it was known as “ONTAP Edge” and was marketed for just what the name said – “edge” use cases, such as remote branch offices or DR sites. It was pretty limited in function; no HA, single node, small data footprint. As such, it didn’t get a huge amount of adoption.

But then, NetApp upped the ante and gave Edge a makeover and called it “ONTAP Select.” While the name kind of reminds you of a bulk-store supercenter membership, Select delivers on several fronts.

With ONTAP Select, you get:

  • Support for multiple hypervisors, including RedHat KVM and VMware
  • HA/failover capability
  • Up to 8 nodes in a cluster (which will likely increase over time)
  • 400TB capacity per node
  • “Pay as you grow” license model
  • Support for:
    • Direct attached HDD or SSD in a Hardware RAID Config
    • Datastores from external arrays (not limited to block-attached LUNs)
    • HCI-based datastores, such as NetApp HCI, vSAN, and Nutanix
  • Ability to install ONTAP Select even on competitor storage systems(!)

There’s plenty more you can read about here:

https://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-4517.pdf 

https://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-4613.pdf

We also did a podcast on ONTAP Select as a vNAS here:

So, what would you use it for?

There are more and more use cases for ONTAP Select popping up, including (but not limited to):

  • Remote branch office
  • SnapMirror destinations
  • Edge to core to cloud/data pipleline use cases (such as machine learning/AI)
  • Ruggedized deployments (think ONTAP on a tank)

There are some new technical reports available for solutions, found here:

Oracle Databases on ONTAP Select:
https://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-4690.pdf

NetApp ONTAP Select Deploy on Intel NUC
https://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-4698-deploy.pdf

And this podcast covered ruggedized ONTAP Select, via Vector Data:

This video also covers ONTAP Select solutions:

Behind the Scenes: Episode 144 – NetApp A-Team ETL 2018

Welcome to the Episode 144, part of the continuing series called “Behind the Scenes of the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast.”

tot-gopher

This week on the podcast, the NetApp A-Team descends upon NetApp HQ in Sunnyvale, CA to get briefings on upcoming roadmap information and to give feedback to product operations.

Included in this podcast are:

Finding the Podcast

The podcast is all finished and up for listening. You can find it on iTunes or SoundCloud or by going to techontappodcast.com.

This week’s episode is here:

Also, if you don’t like using iTunes or SoundCloud, we just added the podcast to Stitcher.

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tech-ontap-podcast?refid=stpr

I also recently got asked how to leverage RSS for the podcast. You can do that here:

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:164421460/sounds.rss

Our YouTube channel (episodes uploaded sporadically) is here: